pedagogue

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See also: pédagogue

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English pedagoge, from Middle French pedagogue, from Latin paedagōgus, from Ancient Greek παιδαγωγός (paidagōgós), from παῖς (paîs, child) + ἀγωγός (agōgós, guide) (from ἄγω (ágō, lead)).[1] By surface analysis, ped- (child) +‎ -agogue.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈpɛdəɡɒɡ/
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

pedagogue (plural pedagogues)

  1. A teacher or instructor of children; one whose occupation is to teach the young.
  2. A pedant; one who by teaching has become overly formal or pedantic in his or her ways; one who has the manner of a teacher.
  3. (historical, Ancient Greece) A slave who led the master's children to school, and had the charge of them generally.

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Verb[edit]

pedagogue (third-person singular simple present pedagogues, present participle pedagoguing, simple past and past participle pedagogued)

  1. To teach.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Douglas Harper (2001–2024), “pedagogue”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.

Middle French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

First attested circa 1371,[1] borrowed from Latin paedagōgus, from Ancient Greek παιδαγωγός (paidagōgós).

Noun[edit]

pedagogue m (plural pedagogues)

  1. pedagogue (one who teaches a child)

Descendants[edit]

  • French: pédagogue
  • Dutch: pedagoog
  • Middle English: pedagoge

References[edit]

  1. ^ Etymology and history of “pedagogue”, in Trésor de la langue française informatisé [Digitized Treasury of the French Language], 2012.