urbane

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French urbain (urban, belonging to a city; also: polite, courteous, elegant, urbane), from Latin urbānus (belonging to a city), with a sense of “having the manners of townspeople” in Classical Latin, from urbs (city).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

urbane (comparative urbaner or more urbane, superlative urbanest or most urbane)

  1. (of a person) Courteous, polite, refined, and suave, usually that of a man.
    • 1851, Herman Melville, Moby Dick, Chapter 1:
      The urbane activity with which a man receives money is really marvellous, considering that we so earnestly believe money to be the root of all earthly ills, and that on no account can a monied man enter heaven. Ah! how cheerfully we consign ourselves to perdition!
    • 1897, Eugen Egner, Midland Monthly Magazine[1], J. Birgham, page 245:
      However, there was nothing for it but to welcome her with all the heartiness I could summon. The sepulchral atomosphere of the parlor had chilled and dampened the spirits of this usually urbane woman, while disappointment and disgust were written in every line of that strong face.
    • 1976, Eugen Egner, National Geographic, Volume 149[2], National Geographic Society, page 106:
      Our people must have some control over our destiny," reasons Wilma Muth, an urbane woman who serves as Inyo County supervisor.
    • 1992, Thomas DiPiero, Dangerous Truths and Criminal Passions: The Evolution of the French Novel, 1569-1791[3], Stanford University Press, →ISBN, page 237:
      Mme de Chartres' advice to her daughter consisted only of prohibitions from which we might infer that the virtuous urbane woman was both inactive and invisible, obviously not a particularly suitable subject for the elaboration of engaging tales.
    • 2017 September 27, David Browne, “Hugh Hefner, 'Playboy' Founder, Dead at 91”, in rollingstone.com[4]:
      And with his trademark smoking jackets and pipes – and the silk pajamas he would often wear to work – Hefner became the embodiment of a sexually adventurous yet urbane image and lifestyle, a seeming role model for generations of men.
    Antonym: rustic

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


German[edit]

Adjective[edit]

urbane

  1. inflection of urban:
    1. strong/mixed nominative/accusative feminine singular
    2. strong nominative/accusative plural
    3. weak nominative all-gender singular
    4. weak accusative feminine/neuter singular

Italian[edit]

Adjective[edit]

urbane

  1. feminine plural of urbano

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

urbāne

  1. vocative singular of urbānus

Etymology 2[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

urbānē (comparative urbānius, superlative urbānissimē)

  1. urbanely

References[edit]

  • urbane in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • urbane in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Adjective[edit]

urbane

  1. definite singular and plural of urban

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Adjective[edit]

urbane

  1. definite singular and plural of urban