vanta

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See also: vänta and Vǟnta

Antillean Creole[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French vantard.

Noun[edit]

vanta

  1. braggart; boaster

Esperanto[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

vanta (accusative singular vantan, plural vantaj, accusative plural vantajn)

  1. frivolous
  2. conceited, vain

See also[edit]


Faroese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

vanta (third person singular past indicative vantaði, third person plural past indicative vantað, supine vantað)

  1. to lack
  2. to want, need (be without, fall short)
mær vantar - I need

Conjugation[edit]


French[edit]

Verb[edit]

vanta

  1. third-person singular past historic of vanter

Anagrams[edit]


Icelandic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse vanta.

Verb[edit]

vanta

  1. to lack
    Það vantar ekki horvatn á þig drengur. - You don't lack sweat boy.
  2. to want (be without, fall short)

Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Italian[edit]

Verb[edit]

vanta

  1. third-person singular present indicative of vantare
  2. second-person singular imperative of vantare

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse vanta.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

vanta (present tense vantar, past tense vanta, past participle vanta, passive infinitive vantast, present participle vantande, imperative vant/vanta)

  1. to lack
  2. be wrong with; have an issue

Synonyms[edit]

References[edit]


Old Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse vanta, from Proto-Germanic *wanatōną.

Verb[edit]

vanta

  1. to be lacking

Conjugation[edit]


Traveller Norwegian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From German Wand.

Noun[edit]

vanta

  1. wall

Derived terms[edit]