altar

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See also: Altar

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin altare (altar), probably related to adolere (burn); thus "burning place", influenced by a false connection with altus (high).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

altar (plural altars)

  1. A table or similar flat-topped structure used for religious rites.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin altāre.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

altar m (plural altars)

  1. altar

Cimbrian[edit]

Noun[edit]

altar m (please provide plural)

  1. altar

References[edit]

  • “altar” in Umberto Martello Martalar, Alfonso Bellotto, Dizionario della lingua Cimbra dei Setti Communi vicentini, 1st edition, 1974.

Faroese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse altari, from Old Saxon altari, from Latin altare (altar), cognates with Danish alter (altar).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

altar n (genitive singular altars, plural altar)

  1. altar

Declension[edit]

n3 Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative altar altarið altar altarini
Accusative altar altarið altar altarini
Dative altari altarinum altarum altarunum
Genitive altars altarsins altara altaranna

Galician[edit]

Noun[edit]

altar m (plural altares)

  1. altar

Synonyms[edit]


Irish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈal̪ˠt̪ˠəɾˠ]

Verb[edit]

altar

  1. present indicative autonomous of alt
  2. imperative autonomous of alt
  3. present subjunctive autonomous of alt

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Eclipsis with h-prothesis with t-prothesis
altar n-altar haltar t-altar
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Found mainly in post-Classical Latin. In Classical Latin, used mostly in plural form altaria. Ultimately from adolere and influenced by altus. See also other forms altāre and altārium.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

altar n (genitive altaris); third declension

  1. altar (for burnt offerings)

Inflection[edit]

Third declension neuter "pure" i-stem.

Number Singular Plural
nominative altar altaria
genitive altaris altarium
dative altarī altaribus
accusative altar altaria
ablative altarī altaribus
vocative altar altaria

Descendants[edit]


Manx[edit]

Noun[edit]

altar m (plural altaryn)

  1. (religion) altar

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia nn

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

altar n (definite singular altaret, indefinite plural altar, definite plural altara)

  1. an altar

Old High German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *aldrą, whence also Old English ealdor, Old Norse aldr.

Noun[edit]

altar n

  1. age

Descendants[edit]


Old Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin altāre (altar for burnt offerings).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

altar m (plural altares)

  1. altar (flat structure used for religious rites)

Descendants[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese altar, from Latin altāre (altar for burnt offerings).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

altar m (plural altares)

  1. altar (flat structure used for religious rites)

Romanian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin altārium or altār. Compare oltar, a rare and dated variant which derives from the same source via a Slavic intermediary.

Noun[edit]

altar n (plural altare)

  1. altar
  2. communion table
  3. chancel
  4. shrine, sanctuary

Synonyms[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin altāre.

Noun[edit]

altar m (plural altares)

  1. altar
  2. Stone that separates the firebox from the hearth in reverberatory furnaces