brach

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See also: Brach

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Originally in plural, from Old French brachez, plural of brachet, a diminutive of Occitan brac, from Frankish. Cognate to the German Bracke.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

brach (plural braches)

  1. (archaic) A hound, especially a female hound used for hunting.
    • 1605, William Shakespeare, King Lear III.vi:
      Mastiff, greyhound, mongrel grim, / Hound or spaniel, brach or him.
    • 1621, Robert Burton, The Anatomy of Melancholy, NYRB 2001, vol. 1 p. 331:
      A sow-pig by chance sucked a brach, and when she was grown, “would miraculously hunt all manner of deer, and that as well, or rather better than any ordinary hound.”

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Czech[edit]

Noun[edit]

brach m

  1. (colloquial) bro
  2. (colloquial) guy

External links[edit]

  • brach in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • brach in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

German[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

brach

  1. First-person singular preterite of brechen.
  2. Third-person singular preterite of brechen.

Adjective[edit]

brach (not comparable)

  1. fallow

Declension[edit]