brat

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See also: Brät, braţ, and bråţ

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Origin uncertain. According to the Online Etymology Dictionary, the term "brat" derives from an Old English (Old English) slang term meaning "beggar's child". Originally a dialectal word, from northern and western England and the Midlands, for a "makeshift or ragged garment"; probably the same word as Old English bratt (cloak), which is from a Celtic source (compare Old Irish bratt (cloak, cloth)).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

brat (plural brats)

  1. A child (as a pejorative term); offspring.
    Get that little brat away from me!
  2. Now often specifically, a selfish or spoiled child.
  3. a turbot or flatfish
  4. (obsolete) A rough cloak or ragged garment
    • 1386, Geoffrey Chaucer, “Line 881”, in The Canon's Yeoman's Tale[1]:
      Whicħ þat þey myght / wrape hem in at nyght / And a brat / to walk in / by day-light
  5. (obsolete, UK, Scotland, dialect) A coarse kind of apron for keeping the clothes clean; a bib.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Wright to this entry?)
  6. (obsolete) The young of an animal.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of L'Estrange to this entry?)
Synonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Shortened from bratwurst, from the German Bratwurst

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

brat (plural brats)

  1. bratwurst
Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Noun[edit]

brat (plural brats)

  1. (mining) A thin bed of coal mixed with pyrites or carbonate of lime.

Etymology 4[edit]

Acronym[edit]

  1. (military) B.R.A.T. - Born, Raised, And Transferred.

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse brattr and Old English brant; in the sense sudden merged with Old Norse bráðr.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /brat/, [b̥ʁɑd̥]

Adjective[edit]

brat (neuter brat, definite and plural bratte, comparative brattere, superlative brattest)

  1. steep
  2. sudden

German[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

brat

  1. Imperative singular of braten.
  2. (colloquial)First-person singular present of braten.

Irish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Irish bratt, from Proto-Celtic *bratto- (compare Welsh brethyn (cloth), from Proto-Celtic *bratt-ino-).

Noun[edit]

brat m (genitive brait, nominative plural brait)

  1. mantle, cloak
  2. covering
  3. (theater) curtain
Declension[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

Noun[edit]

brat m (genitive brat, nominative plural bratanna)

  1. broth; thick soup
Declension[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
brat bhrat mbrat
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Kashubian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *bratrъ, *bratъ, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰréh₂tēr.

Noun[edit]

brat m

  1. brother

Polish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *bratrъ, *bratъ, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰréh₂tēr.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

brat m (diminutive bratek)

  1. brother

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

External links[edit]

  • brat” in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish bratt, from Proto-Celtic *bratto- (compare Welsh brethyn (cloth), from *bratt-ino-).

Noun[edit]

brat m (genitive brata, plural bratan)

  1. cloak, cover, covering, mantle, veil, canopy
  2. mat

Derived terms[edit]


Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *bratrъ, *bratъ, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰréh₂tēr.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

brȁt m (Cyrillic spelling бра̏т)

  1. brother
  2. mate, pal, buddy, when used in informal speech to address somebody in vocative (brate)

Declension[edit]

Usage notes[edit]

There is no plural form for this noun. Instead, the collective term brȁća is used for plural meanings.

Derived terms[edit]


Slovak[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *bratrъ, *bratъ, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰréh₂tēr.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

brat m (genitive singular brata, nominative plural bratia), declension pattern chlap

  1. brother

Declension[edit]


Slovene[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *bratrъ, *bratъ, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰréh₂tēr.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bràt m anim (genitive bráta, nominative plural brátje or bráti)

  1. brother

Declension[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from English brat (spoiled child).

Noun[edit]

brat c

  1. (slang) person who is very careful about following fashion trends; someone who rarely ever acts independently but rather follows peer pressure, usually maintaining an appearance of visible wealth

Usage notes[edit]

  • Mainly used in plural, as a collective noun.
  • Can occasionally be seen considered as neuter rather than common.

Synonyms[edit]