faux

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from French faux.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

faux (not comparable)

  1. Fake or artificial
    clothing made from faux leather
    a faux-archaic style of speech
    faux wine

Antonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old French fauz, faus from Latin falsus

Adjective[edit]

faux m (feminine fausse, masculine plural faux, feminine plural fausses)

  1. false; untrue
  2. false; not real
Antonyms[edit]

Adverb[edit]

faux

  1. badly; inaccurately; untruly

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin falx.

Noun[edit]

faux f (plural faux)

  1. scythe

See also[edit]

See also[edit]

External links[edit]


Jèrriais[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old French faulz, the plural of fault, ultimately from Latin falsus.

Adjective[edit]

faux m (feminine fausse, masculine plural faux, feminine plural fausses)

  1. false
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin falx, from Proto-Indo-European *dhalk-, *dhalg- (a cutting tool).

Noun[edit]

faux f (plural faux)

  1. scythe

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Etymology unknown. See also fauces.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

faux f (genitive faucis); third declension

  1. throat, gullet
  2. chasm

Inflection[edit]

Third declension i-stem, alternative accusative singular in -im and ablative singular in .

Number Singular Plural
nominative faux faucēs
genitive faucis faucium
dative faucī faucibus
accusative faucim
faucem
faucīs
faucēs
ablative faucī
fauce
faucibus
vocative faux faucēs

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Middle French[edit]

Adjective[edit]

faux m (feminine singular fauce, masculine plural faux, feminine plural fauces)

  1. Alternative form of faulx