magister

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See also: Magister and magíster

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin magister (a master, chief, head, superior, director, teacher, etc.), from magis (more or great) + -ter.

Noun[edit]

magister (plural magisters)

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  1. Master; sir: -- a title of the Middle Ages, given to a person in authority, or to one having a license from a university to teach philosophy and the liberal arts.
  2. The possessor of a master's degree.

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Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From magis (more or great) + *-tero-. Compare minister.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

magister m (genitive magistrī); second declension

  1. teacher.
  2. master; a title of the Middle Ages, given to a person in authority, or to one having a license from a university to teach philosophy and the liberal arts.

Declension[edit]

Second declension, nominative singular in -er.

Number Singular Plural
nominative magister magistrī
genitive magistrī magistrōrum
dative magistrō magistrīs
accusative magistrum magistrōs
ablative magistrō magistrīs
vocative magister
magistre
magistrī

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Norwegian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin magister.

Noun[edit]

magister

  1. The possessor of the academic degree of magister, an historical equivalent of the doctorate (1479–1845 and 1921–2003)

Romansch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin magister.

Noun[edit]

magister m (plural magisters)

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun, Puter, Vallader) male teacher

Synonyms[edit]

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Sutsilvan, Surmiran) scolast
  • (Sutsilvan) surmester

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