quantum

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English[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

From Late Latin quantum, noun use of neuter form of Latin quantus (how much).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

quantum (plural quanta)

  1. (now chiefly South Asia) The total amount of something; quantity. [from 17th c.]
    • Burke
      without authenticating [] the quantum of the charges
    • 1749, Henry Fielding, Tom Jones, Folio Society 1973, p. 416:
      The reader will perhaps be curious to know the quantum of this present, but we cannot satisfy his curiosity.
    • 2008, The Times of India, 21 May 2008, [1]:
      The Congress's core ministerial panel on Friday gave its green signal to raising motor fuel prices but the quantum of increase emerged as a hitch.
  2. The amount or quantity observably present, or available. [from 18th c.]
    • 1979, John Le Carré, Smiley's People, Folio Society 2010, p. 96:
      Each man has only a quantum of compassion, he argued, and mine is used up for the day.
    • 1999, Joyce Crick, translating Sigmund Freud, The Interpretation of Dreams, Oxford 2008, p. 34:
      The dream of flying, according to Strümpell, is the appropriate image used by the psyche to interpret the quantum of stimulus [transl. Reizquantum] proceeding from the rise and fall of the lungs when the cutaneous sensation of the thorax has simultaneously sunk into unconsciousness.
  3. (physics) The smallest possible, and therefore indivisible, unit of a given quantity or quantifiable phenomenon. [from 20th c.]
    • 2002, David C Cassidy et al., Understanding Physics, Birkhauser 2002, p. 602:
      The quantum of light energy was later called a photon.
  4. (mathematics) A definite portion of a manifoldness, limited by a mark or by a boundary.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of W. K. Clifford to this entry?)

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Adjective[edit]

quantum (not comparable)

  1. Of a change, sudden or discrete, without intermediate stages.
  2. (informal) Of a change, significant.
  3. (physics) Involving quanta.
    • 2012 January 1, Michael Riordan, “Tackling Infinity”, American Scientist, volume 100, number 1, page 86: 
      Some of the most beautiful and thus appealing physical theories, including quantum electrodynamics and quantum gravity, have been dogged for decades by infinities that erupt when theorists try to prod their calculations into new domains. Getting rid of these nagging infinities has probably occupied far more effort than was spent in originating the theories.
  4. (computing theory) Relating to a quantum computer.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English quantum.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /kɑ̃tɔm/, /kwɑ̃tɔm/

Noun[edit]

quantum m (plural quanta)

  1. (physics) quantum

External links[edit]


Italian[edit]

Noun[edit]

quantum m (plural quanta)

  1. quantum

Synonyms[edit]


Latin[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

quantum

  1. nominative neuter singular of quantus
  2. accusative masculine singular of quantus
  3. accusative neuter singular of quantus
  4. vocative neuter singular of quantus

Determiner[edit]

quantum (with genitive)

  1. as much of [] as
  2. how high, how dear, as dear as

Novial[edit]

Adverb[edit]

quantum

  1. (interrogative) how much
    Quantum lu kosta?
    How much does it cost?