utu

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See also: UTU, Utu, ütü, and 'utu

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Maori utu.

Noun[edit]

utu

  1. (New Zealand) Recompense, payback; revenge.
    • 2008, Christina Thompson, Come on Shore and We Will Kill and Eat You All, Bloomsbury 2009, p. 129:
      Utu demanded that both favors and grievances be repaid in kind, but it was the grievances, naturally, that caused the most trouble.
    • 2011, Andrew Alderson, New Zealand Herald, 19 Sep 2011:
      The match had been touted as a chance for utu after the 1999 and 2007 All Blacks World Cup defeats.

Buginese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *kutu, from Proto-Austronesian *kuCu.

Noun[edit]

utu

  1. louse (insect)

Finnish[edit]

(index u)

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈutu/
  • Hyphenation: u‧tu

Noun[edit]

Finnish Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia fi

utu

  1. Haze, mist.

Usage notes[edit]

  • The words sumu, usva and utu all describe "visible water vapor lightly suspended near the ground", but at different degrees. However, they may often be used synonymously with no discretion.
Utu describes very light vapor near the ground, especially that occurring in the morning and therefore it is translated usually as mist or haze.
Usva describes a bit thicker vapor than utu near the ground, especially when considering the water travelling conditions. Therefore, it is translated usually as mist, haze or fog.
Sumu describes very thick vapor obscuring the visibility near the ground and thus, it is translated usually as mist or fog.

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Maori[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Polynesian, from Proto-Oceanic, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *utuŋ (compare Indonesian untung, Malay untung).

Noun[edit]

utu

  1. pay

Swahili[edit]

Etymology[edit]

u- (-ness) +‎ mtu (man)

Noun[edit]

utu (u class, no plural)

  1. manhood