woo

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See also: woo woo

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English wowen, woȝen, from Old English wōgian (to woo, court, marry), of uncertain origin. Cognate with Scots wow (to woo). Perhaps related to Old English wōg, wōh (bending, crookedness), in the specific sense of "bend or incline (some)one toward oneself". If so, then derived from Proto-Germanic *wanhō (a bend, angle), from Proto-Indo-European *wonk- (crooked, bent), from Proto-Indo-European *wā- (to bend, twist, turn); related to Old Norse (corner, angle).

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

woo (third-person singular simple present woos, present participle wooing, simple past and past participle wooed)

  1. (transitive) To endeavor to gain someone's support.
  2. (transitive) (often of a man) To try to persuade someone to marry oneself; to solicit in love.
    • Prior
      Each, like the Grecian artist, wooes / The image he himself has wrought.
  3. To court solicitously; to invite with importunity.
    • Milton
      Thee, chantress, oft the woods among / I woo, to hear thy even song.
    • Bryant
      I woo the wind / That still delays his coming.
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Etymology 2[edit]

Interjection[edit]

woo

  1. (slang) Expressing joy or mirth; woohoo, yahoo.
    "I got you a new cell phone." "Woo, that's great!"

Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English , wēa.

Noun[edit]

woo (plural woos)

  1. torment; anguish

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Descendants[edit]