छाया

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Hindi[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Sanskrit छाया (chāyā).

Noun[edit]

छाया (chāyāf (Urdu spelling چھایا)

  1. shade, a shady place
    तुम्हें छाया में बैठना चाहिए, क्योंकि बहुत गर्मी है।
    tumhẽ chāyā mẽ baiṭhnā cāhie, kyoṅki bahut garmī hai.
    You should sit in the shade, because it is very hot.
  2. shadow, silhouette
    पृथ्वी की छाया चन्द्रमा पर है।
    pŕthvī kī chāyā candramā par hai.
    The earth's shadow is on the moon.
  3. (rare) apparition, spectre
  4. (rare) refuge, protection, shelter

Synonyms[edit]

References[edit]

  • John T. Platts (accessed 09-21-2012), “A Dictionary of Urdu, Classical Hindi, and English”, in (Please provide the title of the work)[1]
  • Hardev Bahri (accessed 09-21-2012), “Learners' Hindi-English Dictionary”, in (Please provide the title of the work)[2]

Pali[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

छाया f

  1. shade
  2. shadow

Declension[edit]


Sanskrit[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *skoy-eh₂, from *skey- (to split, to dissect).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈt͡ɕʰɑː.jɑː/

Noun[edit]

छाया (chāyā́f

  1. shadow
  2. shade; shady place
  3. reflection
  4. shading or blending of colours; play of light or colour

Declension[edit]

Feminine ā-stem declension of छाया
Nom. sg. छाया (chāyā)
Gen. sg. छायायाः (chāyāyāḥ)
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative छाया (chāyā) छाये (chāye) छायाः (chāyāḥ)
Vocative छाये (chāye) छाये (chāye) छायाः (chāyāḥ)
Accusative छायाम् (chāyām) छाये (chāye) छायाः (chāyāḥ)
Instrumental छायया (chāyayā) छायाभ्याम् (chāyābhyām) छायाभिः (chāyābhiḥ)
Dative छायायै (chāyāyai) छायाभ्याम् (chāyābhyām) छायाभ्यः (chāyābhyaḥ)
Ablative छायायाः (chāyāyāḥ) छायाभ्याम् (chāyābhyām) छायाभ्यः (chāyābhyaḥ)
Genitive छायायाः (chāyāyāḥ) छाययोः (chāyayoḥ) छायानाम् (chāyānām)
Locative छायायाम् (chāyāyām) छाययोः (chāyayoḥ) छायासु (chāyāsu)

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • Sir Monier Monier-Williams (1898) A Sanskrit-English dictionary etymologically and philologically arranged with special reference to cognate Indo-European languages, Oxford: Clarendon Press, page 406/1