adept

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French adepte, from Latin adeptus (who has achieved), the past participle of adipisci (to attain).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK, US, adjective) IPA(key): /əˈdɛpt/, /ˈæd.ɛpt/
  • (UK, US, noun) IPA(key): /ˈæd.ɛpt/, /ædˈɛpt/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɛpt

Adjective[edit]

adept (comparative more adept or adepter, superlative most adept or adeptest)

  1. Well skilled; completely versed; thoroughly proficient
    • 1837-1839, Charles Dickens, Oliver Twist
      Adept as she was, in all the arts of cunning and dissimulation, the girl Nancy could not wholly conceal the effect which the knowledge of the step she had taken, wrought upon her mind.

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

adept (plural adepts)

  1. One fully skilled or well versed in anything; a proficient
    adepts in philosophy
    • 1841, Charles Dickens, Barnaby Rudge:
      When he had achieved this task, he applied himself to the acquisition of stable language, in which he soon became such an adept, that he would perch outside my window and drive imaginary horses with great skill, all day.
    • 1894-95, Thomas Hardy, Jude the Obscure:
      Others, alas, had an instinct towards artificiality in their very blood, and became adepts in counterfeiting at the first glimpse of it.

Synonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin adeptus (who has achieved).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

adept m (definite singular adepten, indefinite plural adepter, definite plural adeptene)

  1. an adept (person)

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin adeptus (who has achieved). The adjective is of the same origin, though likely through English adept.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

adept m (definite singular adepten, indefinite plural adeptar, definite plural adeptane)

  1. an adept, skillful person
  2. an inductee to an order, a secret society or a science
  3. (historical) an alchemist
  4. a very knowledgeable person
  5. (by extension, derogatory) a know-it-all, a self-declared expert
  6. a student of a craft

Adjective[edit]

adept (indefinite singular adept, definite singular and plural adepte)

  1. adept (very skilled)

References[edit]


Polish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French adepte, from Latin adeptus. [First attested in 1807.][1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

adept m pers (feminine adeptka)

  1. apprentice, trainee; novice (person training in a given field or new in a given field)
    młody adepta young apprentice
    początkujący adepta beginner apprentice
    adept dziennikarstwaa journalism apprentice
    adept futbolua football/soccer apprentice
    adept malarstwaa painting apprentice
    adept medycynya medical apprentice
    adept pióraan apprentice of the pen
    adept sztukian art apprentice
  2. adept (person with secret information)
    adept alchemiian alchemy adept
    adept czarnej magiia black magic adept
    adept wiedzy tajemnejan adept of secret knowledge

Declension[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Samuel Bogumił Linde (1807) Słownik języka polskiego[1]
  • Pęzik, Piotr; Przepiórkowski, A.; Bańko, M.; Górski, R.; Lewandowska-Tomaszczyk, B (2012) Wyszukiwarka PELCRA dla danych NKJP. Narodowy Korpus Języka Polskiego [National Polish Language Corpus, PELCRA search engine]‎[2], Wydawnictwo PWN

Further reading[edit]

  • adept in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • adept in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French adepte.

Noun[edit]

adept m (plural adepți)

  1. follower
  2. disciple

Declension[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Noun[edit]

adept c

  1. a pupil, a student, an apprentice, a disciple

Declension[edit]

Declension of adept 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative adept adepten adepter adepterna
Genitive adepts adeptens adepters adepternas

Synonyms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]