ayah

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English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From various Indian languages (e.g. Hindi आया (āyā, dry nurse, nanny)), from Portuguese aia (nurse, governess), feminine of aio (tutor), possibly from Latin avia (grandmother).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ayah (plural ayahs)

  1. A South Asian female servant, maid or nanny, historically, often one working for Europeans in South Asia.
    • 1888, Rudyard Kipling, “Watches of the Night”, in Plain Tales from the Hills (fiction):
      She manufactured the Station scandal, and talked to her ayah.
    • 1989, Shashi Tharoor, The Great Indian Novel, New York: Arcade Publishing, 2011, Book 4,[3]
      [] a cot of iron had to be manufactured for [Bhim] after he had demolished two wooden cribs with a lusty kick of his foot; and a succession of bruised ayahs had finally to be replaced by a male attendant, a former Hastinapur all-in wrestling champion.
See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from Arabic آيَة(ʾāya, sign, token).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈaɪ.(j)ɑ/, /aɪ.ə/

Noun[edit]

ayah (plural ayahs or ayat)

  1. (Islam) A verse in the Quran.
    Synonym: ayat
Alternative forms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Indonesian[edit]

Indonesian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia id

Etymology[edit]

From Malay ayah (father), from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *aya (father’s sister, father’s sister’s husband), from Proto-Austronesian *aya.[1][2]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /a.jah/
  • Hyphenation: a‧yah

Noun[edit]

ayah (first-person possessive ayahku, second-person possessive ayahmu, third-person possessive ayahnya)

  1. (formal) father (male parent)

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Robert Blust; David F. Aberle; N. J. Allen; R. H. Barnes; Ann Chowning (1980-04-01), “Early Austronesian Social Organization: The Evidence of Language [and Comments and Reply]”, in Current Anthropology[1], volume 21, issue 2, DOI:10.1086/202430, ISSN 0011-3204, page 205–247
  2. ^ Robert Blust (1993), “Austronesian sibling terms and culture history”, in Bijdragen tot de taal-, land- en volkenkunde / Journal of the Humanities and Social Sciences of Southeast Asia[2], volume 149, issue 1, DOI:10.1163/22134379-90003136, ISSN 0006-2294, page 22–76

Further reading[edit]


Malay[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ajah/
  • Rhymes: -ajah, -jah, -ah
  • (file)

Etymology 1[edit]

Malay Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia ms

From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *aya (father’s sister, father’s sister’s husband), from Proto-Austronesian *aya.

Noun[edit]

ayah (Jawi spelling ايه‎, plural ayah-ayah, informal 1st possessive ayahku, 2nd possessive ayahmu, 3rd possessive ayahnya)

  1. (formal, polite) father (male parent)
    Ayah DanielDaniel's father
    Synonyms: abah, bapa, rama
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • Indonesian: ayah

Etymology 2[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Borrowed from Hindi आया (āyā), from Portuguese aia.

Noun[edit]

ayah (Jawi spelling ايه‎, plural ayah-ayah, informal 1st possessive ayahku, 2nd possessive ayahmu, 3rd possessive ayahnya)

  1. (dated) nursemaid, usually one of Indian ancestry
Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]