cervix

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See also: cérvix

English[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

From Latin cervīx (neck), see below.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cervix (plural cervixes or cervices)

  1. (anatomy) The neck
  2. The necklike portion of any part, as of the womb.
  3. The lower, narrow portion of the uterus where it joins with the top end of the vagina.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin cervīx, see below.

Noun[edit]

cervix m (plural cervixen or cervices, diminutive cervixje n)

  1. (anatomy) the neck
  2. (anatomy) The cervix between the uterus and the vagina.

Synonyms[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *ḱerh₂- (head) and *weyk- (to bend), "where the head turns", whence cerebrum and vinciō.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cervīx f (genitive cervīcis); third declension

  1. (anatomy) The neck of a person or animal.
  2. (by extension) The neck of an objects (e.g. bottle).
  3. (figuratively) Boldness, headstrong behavior.

Inflection[edit]

Third declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative cervīx cervīcēs
genitive cervīcis cervīcum
dative cervīcī cervīcibus
accusative cervīcem cervīcēs
ablative cervīce cervīcibus
vocative cervīx cervīcēs

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • cervix in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • cervix in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • du Cange, Charles (1883), “cervix”, in G. A. Louis Henschel, Pierre Carpentier, Léopold Favre, editors, Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (in Latin), Niort: L. Favre
  • cervix” in Félix Gaffiot’s Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette (1934)
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to break a person's neck: cervices (in Cic. only in plur.) frangere alicui or alicuius
    • a sword hangs over his neck: gladius cervicibus impendet
    • the foe is at our heels, is upon us: hostis in cervicibus alicuius est
    • to shake off the yoke of slavery: iugum servile a cervicibus deicere (Phil. 1. 2. 6)