cervical

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French, from New Latin cervīcālis, from cervīx (neck, nape) +‎ -ālis (-al, adjectival suffix).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

cervical (not comparable)

  1. (anatomy, relational) Of or pertaining to the neck.
    cervical pain
  2. (anatomy, relational) Of or pertaining to the cervix.

Coordinate terms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Noun[edit]

cervical (plural cervicals)

  1. Ellipsis of cervical vertebra.

References[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from New Latin cervicalis, formed from the root of Latin cervix (the neck, nape of the neck) and -alis (see -al).

Adjective[edit]

cervical (feminine singular cervicale, masculine plural cervicaux, feminine plural cervicales)

  1. cervical

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from New Latin cervicalis, formed from the root of Latin cervix (the neck, nape of the neck) and -alis (see -al).

Adjective[edit]

cervical m or f (plural cervicais)

  1. (anatomy) cervical

Derived terms[edit]


Interlingua[edit]

Adjective[edit]

cervical (not comparable)

  1. cervical

Related terms[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From cervix.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cervīcal n (genitive cervīcālis); third declension

  1. pillow, cushion, bolster

Declension[edit]

Third-declension noun (neuter, “pure” i-stem).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative cervīcal cervīcālia
Genitive cervīcālis cervīcālium
Dative cervīcālī cervīcālibus
Accusative cervīcal cervīcālia
Ablative cervīcālī cervīcālibus
Vocative cervīcal cervīcālia

References[edit]

  • cervical in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • cervical in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • cervical in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • cervical in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • cervical in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • cervical in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from New Latin cervicalis, formed from the root of Latin cervix (the neck, nape of the neck) and -alis (see -al). Equivalent to cérvice +‎ -al.

Adjective[edit]

cervical m or f (plural cervicais, comparable)

  1. (anatomy) cervical (relating to the cervix or neck)

Related terms[edit]


Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French cervical

Adjective[edit]

cervical m or n (feminine singular cervicală, masculine plural cervicali, feminine and neuter plural cervicale)

  1. cervical

Declension[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from New Latin cervicalis, formed from the root of Latin cervix (the neck, nape of the neck) and -alis (see -al). Equivalent to cérvix +‎ -al.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): (Spain) /θeɾbiˈkal/, [θeɾ.β̞iˈkal]
  • IPA(key): (Latin America) /seɾbiˈkal/, [seɾ.β̞iˈkal]
  • Rhymes: -al
  • Hyphenation: cer‧vi‧cal

Adjective[edit]

cervical (plural cervicales)

  1. cervical

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]