bolster

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See also: Bolster

English[edit]

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A bolster on a bed.

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English bolster, bolstre, from Old English bolster (pillow), from Proto-Germanic *bulstraz, *bulstrą (pillow, cushion). Cognate with Scots bowster (bolster), West Frisian bulster (mattress), Dutch bolster (husk, shell), German Polster (bolster, pillow, pad), Swedish bolster (soft mattress, bolster), Icelandic bólstur (pillow).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

Bolster or pillow (structural) (geograph.org.uk - 325191)

bolster (plural bolsters)

  1. A large cushion or pillow.
  2. A pad, quilt, or anything used to hinder pressure, support part of the body, or make a bandage sit easy upon a wounded part; a compress.
    • (Can we date this quote by John Gay and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      This arm shall be a bolster for thy head.
  3. (vehicles, agriculture) A small spacer located on top of the axle of horse-drawn wagons that gives the front wheels enough clearance to turn.
  4. A short, horizontal structural timber between a post and a beam for enlarging the bearing area of the post and/or reducing the span of the beam.
    Synonyms: cross-head, pillow
  5. A beam in the middle of a railway truck, supporting the body of the car.
  6. The perforated plate in a punching machine on which anything rests when being punched.
  7. The part of a knife blade that abuts upon the end of the handle.
  8. The metallic end of a pocketknife handle.
  9. (architecture) The rolls forming the ends or sides of the Ionic capital.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of G. Francis to this entry?)
  10. (military, historical) A block of wood on the carriage of a siege gun, upon which the breech of the gun rests when arranged for transportation.

Synonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

bolster (third-person singular simple present bolsters, present participle bolstering, simple past and past participle bolstered)

  1. (transitive, often figuratively) To brace, reinforce, secure, or support.
    • 2017 January 20, Annie Zaleski, “AFI sounds refreshed and rejuvenated on its 10th album, AFI (The Blood Album)”, in The Onion AV Club[1]:
      Puget also teamed up with Matt Hyde (Deftones, Slayer) to co-produce the record, which was another smart move: Together, the pair ensures that AFI (The Blood Album)‘s arrangements are streamlined, but bolstered by just the right amount of atmospheric texture.
    • 2019 October, Philip Sherratt, “Midland Main Line upgrade presses on”, in Modern Railways, page 62:
      However, once the bi-modes come on stream this [the power supply] will need to be bolstered by a feed at Braybrooke, just south of Market Harborough, for which reason the Department for Transport has supported the extension of overhead electrification from Kettering to Market Harborough.

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch bolster, ultimately from Proto-Germanic *bulstraz. This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈbɔl.stər/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: bol‧ster
  • Rhymes: -ɔlstər

Noun[edit]

bolster m (plural bolsters, diminutive bolstertje n)

  1. a bur, a spiny cupule, often of a chestnut

Derived terms[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English bolster, from Proto-Germanic *bulstraz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bolster (plural bolsters)

  1. A soft stuffed bag to lie or lean on; a cushion or pillow.
  2. (rare) A pad; a piece of cushioning.
  3. (rare) A supporting piece of metal.

Descendants[edit]

  • English: bolster

References[edit]


Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *bulstraz.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈbol.ster/, [ˈboɫ.ster]

Noun[edit]

bolster m

  1. pillow
    Tō slāpenne iċ þearf simle hūru twēġa bolstra.
    I always need at least two pillows to sleep.

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Swedish bulster, bolster, from Old Norse bólstr, bulstr, from Proto-Germanic *bulstraz, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰelǵʰ- (bag, pillow, paunch). Compare Icelandic bólstur, Dutch bolster, German Polster and English bolster.

Noun[edit]

bolster n

  1. a bolster, a large cushion or pillow

Declension[edit]

Declension of bolster 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative bolster bolstret bolster bolstren
Genitive bolsters bolstrets bolsters bolstrens