conclave

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See also: cónclave

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French, from Latin conclave (room that may be locked up), from con- (combining form of cum (with)) + clāvis (key).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

conclave (plural conclaves)

  1. The set of apartments within which the cardinals of the Roman Catholic Church are continuously secluded while engaged in choosing a pope.
  2. The group of Roman Catholic cardinals locked in a conclave until they elect a new pope; the body of cardinals.
    • Robert South
      It was said a cardinal, by reason of his apparent likelihood to step into St. Peter's chair, that in two conclaves he went in pope and came out again cardinal.
  3. A private meeting; a close or secret assembly.
    • Thomas Babington Macaulay
      The verdicts pronounced by this conclave (Johnson's Club) on new books, were speedily known over all London.

Derived terms[edit]

  • in conclave: engaged in a secret meeting; said of a group of people.

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin conclave.

Noun[edit]

conclave m (plural conclaves)

  1. conclave

Synonyms[edit]


Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin conclave.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

conclave m (plural conclavi)

  1. conclave

Derived terms[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From con- +‎ clāvis (key).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

conclāve n (genitive conclāvis); third declension

  1. room, chamber
  2. enclosed space that can be locked
  3. dining hall

Inflection[edit]

Third declension neuter “pure” i-stem.

Case Singular Plural
nominative conclāve conclāvia
genitive conclāvis conclāvium
dative conclāvī conclāvibus
accusative conclāve conclāvia
ablative conclāvī conclāvibus
vocative conclāve conclāvia

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • conclave in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • conclave in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • du Cange, Charles (1883), “conclave”, in G. A. Louis Henschel, Pierre Carpentier, Léopold Favre, editors, Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (in Latin), Niort: L. Favre
  • conclave” in Félix Gaffiot’s Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette (1934)
  • conclave in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • conclave in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin

Spanish[edit]

Noun[edit]

conclave m (plural conclaves)

  1. conclave