corollary

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English, from Late Latin corōllārium (money paid for a garland; gift, gratuity, something extra; consequence, deduction), from corōlla (small garland), diminutive of corōna (crown).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

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corollary (plural corollaries)

  1. Something given beyond what is actually due; something added or superfluous.
  2. Something which occurs a fortiori, as a result of another effort without significant additional effort.
    Finally getting that cracked window fixed was a nice corollary of redoing the whole storefront.
  3. (mathematics, logic) A proposition which follows easily from the proof of another proposition.
    We have proven that this set is finite and well ordered; as a corollary, we now know that there is an order-preserving map from it to the natural numbers.

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Adjective[edit]

corollary (not comparable)

  1. Occurring as a natural consequence or result; attendant; consequential.
    • 2019, Li Huang; James Lambert, “Another Arrow for the Quiver: A New Methodology for Multilingual Researchers”, in Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development, DOI:10.1080/01434632.2019.1596115, page 11:
      However, given current sensibilities about individual privacy and data protection, the recording of oral data is becoming increasingly onerous for researchers who are obliged to navigate an often time-consuming and complex series of administrative requirements and corollary review processes in order to be granted ethics clearance.
  2. (rare) Forming a proposition that follows from one already proved.

Further reading[edit]