coucher

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See also: Coucher

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English coucher, from Anglo-Norman; equivalent to couch +‎ -er.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

coucher (plural couchers)

  1. One who couches.
  2. (papermaking) One who couches paper.
  3. (UK, law, obsolete) A factor or agent resident in a country for traffic.
    • 1601, John Keymor, “Observation made upon the Dutch fishing”, in The Phenix:
      She [the Herring-Buss] imployeth [] at Land Viewers, Packers, [] Couchers to make the Herrings lawful Merchandizes.
  4. The book in which a corporation or other body registers its particular acts.
    • 1559, Iniunctions geven by the Queenes Maiestie [] :
      bookes, and specially of Grayles, Couchers, Legends, Processionailes []

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French coucher, from Old French couchier, from Latin collocāre (set in place). Doublet of colloquer.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ku.ʃe/
  • (file)

Verb[edit]

coucher

  1. (transitive) to lay, to lay down
  2. (transitive) to put to bed, to put up (a lodger)
  3. (reflexive) to go to bed
  4. (reflexive) (of celestial objects) to set
    Antonym: se lever
    Quand le Soleil se couche-t-il ce soir ?When does the sun set?
    Le Soleil se lève à l'est et se couche à l'ouest.
    The sun rises in the east and sets in the west.
    Les deux cercles polaires sont les parallèles des régions polaires au-delà desquels il existe au moins une journée où le Soleil ne se lève pas en hiver, et ne se couche pas en été.
    The two polar circles are the parallels of the polar regions beyond which there is at least one day when the Sun does not rise in winter and does not set in summer.
  5. (transitive, agriculture) to lodge, to beat down (wheat)
  6. (transitive) to layer (branches)
  7. (transitive) to slant (writing)
  8. (transitive, military) to aim at
  9. (intransitive) to sleep
    • 1785, Donatien Alphonse François de Sade, Les 120 journées de Sodome, ou l'École du libertinage
      Le soir, Michette est livrée en cul. Durcet prend la Martaine pour coucher dans sa chambre, à l'exemple du duc qui a Duclos et de Curval qui a Fanchon; cette fille prend sur lui le même empire lubrique que Duclos sur le duc.
      (please add an English translation of this quote)
  10. (intransitive) to spend the night
  11. (intransitive) to lodge
  12. (intransitive) to pack off to bed
    coucher avecto sleep with

Conjugation[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Esperanto: kuŝi
  • German: kusch
  • Italian: cucciare

Noun[edit]

coucher m (plural couchers)

  1. going to bed
  2. bedding
  3. room and board
  4. setting (sun)
    coucher de soleil — sunset, sundown

Further reading[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Anglo-Norman; equivalent to couche +‎ -er.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈkuːtʃər/, /ˈkuːtʃuːr/

Noun[edit]

coucher (plural couchers)

  1. A worker of inlaid gems and metals.
  2. A book containing prayers; a prayer-book.
  3. (rare) One who lies in bed (either due to necessity or laziness).
  4. (rare) A breed of dog.

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]


Middle French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French couchier.

Verb[edit]

coucher

  1. (transitive) to put to bed

Conjugation[edit]

  • Middle French conjugation varies from one text to another. Hence, the following conjugation should be considered as typical, not as exhaustive.

Descendants[edit]

Noun[edit]

coucher m (plural couchers)

  1. setting (of the sun)