curio

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Curio and cúrio

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Clipping of curiosity, 1851.[1] Compare cabinet of curiosities and French objet de curiosité.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈkjʊə̯ɹiˌəʊ̯/, /ˈkjɜːɹiˌəʊ̯/, /ˈkjɔːɹiˌəʊ̯/

Noun[edit]

curio (plural curios)

  1. A strange and interesting object; something that evokes curiosity.
    • 2013, Joan Lee Faust, The New York Times Garden Book, Revised:
      Staghorn ferns, with their antlerlike leaves, are really curios of ferndom and never fail to gain attention.
    • 2012 March 1, David Graeber, “Of Flying Cars and the Declining Rate of Profit”, in The Baffler[1]:
      Video telephony is just about the only new technology from that particular movie that has appeared—and it was technically possible when the movie was showing. 2001 can be seen as a curio, but what about Star Trek?
    • 2018 September 19, Katie Rife, “Eli Roth, of all directors, brings Amblin magic to the kid-lit horror of The House With A Clock In Its Walls”, in The Onion AV Club[2]:
      upon his arrival, Lewis discovers that his uncle’s place is no threadbare bachelor pad. It’s a creaky old Victorian mansion, full of overstuffed chairs, flocked wallpaper, stained glass, creepy carnival curios, and dozens and dozens of clocks.

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

See also: Thesaurus:trinket.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Douglas Harper (2001–2022), “curio”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.

Anagrams[edit]


Galician[edit]

Galician Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia gl

Noun[edit]

curio m (uncountable)

  1. curium

Italian[edit]

Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia it
Chemical element
Cm
Previous: americio (Am)
Next: berkelio (Bk)

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈku.rjo/
  • Rhymes: -urjo
  • Hyphenation: cù‧rio

Noun[edit]

curio m (plural curi)

  1. (chemistry) curium

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Noun[edit]

curiō

  1. dative/ablative singular of curium

References[edit]

  • curio”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • curio in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • curio”, in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • curio in Ramminger, Johann (accessed 16 July 2016) Neulateinische Wortliste: Ein Wörterbuch des Lateinischen von Petrarca bis 1700[3], pre-publication website, 2005-2016
  • curio”, in William Smith, editor (1848) A Dictionary of Greek Biography and Mythology, London: John Murray
  • curio”, in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin

Spanish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈkuɾjo/, [ˈku.ɾjo]

Etymology 1[edit]

Chemical element
Cm
Previous: americio (Am)
Next: berkelio (Bk)

From English curium, after Pierre and Marie Curie + -io.

Noun[edit]

curio m (uncountable)

  1. curium
See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Spanish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia es

From English curie or French curie, named after Pierre and Marie Curie.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

curio m (plural curios)

  1. curie

Further reading[edit]