dint

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: din't and di'n't

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /dɪnt/
  • (US)
    (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪnt

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English dint, dent, dünt, from Old English dynt (dint, blow, strike, stroke, bruise, stripe; the mark left by a blow; the sound or noise made by a blow, thud), from Proto-Germanic *duntiz (a blow), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰen- (to strike, hit). Cognate with Swedish dialectal dunt, Icelandic dyntr (a dint). More at dent.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

dint (countable and uncountable, plural dints)

  1. (obsolete) A blow, stroke, especially dealt in a fight.
  2. Force, power; especially in by dint of.
  3. The mark left by a blow; an indentation or impression made by violence; a dent.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

dint (third-person singular simple present dints, present participle dinting, simple past and past participle dinted)

  1. To dent.
    • 1854, W. Harrison Ainsworth, The Star-Chamber, Volume 2[1]:
      Your helmet was dinted in as if by a great shot.
    • 1915, Jeffery Farnol, Beltane The Smith[2]:
      And, in that moment came one, fierce and wild of aspect, in dinted casque and rusty mail who stood and watched--ah God!

Etymology 2[edit]

Contraction[edit]

dint

  1. Pronunciation spelling of didn’t.

Anagrams[edit]


Friulian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin dēns, dentem. Compare Italian dente, Romansch dent, Venetian dénte, Romanian dinte, French dent, Spanish diente.

Noun[edit]

dint m (plural dinčh)

  1. tooth

Derived terms[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English dynt, from Proto-Germanic *duntiz.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /dint/, /dɛnt/, /dunt/

Noun[edit]

dint (plural dintes or (Early ME) dunten)

  1. The landing of a weapon; a blow or stroke.
    • a. 1375, Gawain Poet, Sir Gawayn and þe Grene Knyȝt, lines 2110-2117, page 118r:
      Forþy I ſay þe, as ſoþe as ȝe in ſadel ſitte, / Com ȝe þere, ȝe be kylled, may þe knyȝt rede, / Trawe ȝe me þat trwely, þaȝ ȝe had twenty lyues / to ſpende. / He hatz wonyd here ful ȝore / On bent much baret bende / Aȝayn his dyntez ſore / Ȝe may not yow defende
      So I say to you, as sure as you sit in your saddle: / If you come there, you'll be killed if he wills, / trust me about that truely, like you had twenty lives / to spend. / He has lived here a long time; / when he pulls his bow, much conflict begins. / Against his powerful blows, / you won't be able to defend yourself.
  2. (by extension) Warfare, battle; the use of weaponry.
  3. The strike, landing or force of a tool or other item hitting something.
  4. The striking or noise of thunder; a thunderclap.
  5. (rare) A strike with one's limbs or body.
  6. (rare) An injury resulting from a weapon's impact.

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • English: dent, dint, dunt
  • Scots: dunt, dont, dynt, dint, dent

Further reading[edit]


Old Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Univerbation of di +‎ in

Pronunciation[edit]

Article[edit]

dint

  1. of/from the sg
    • c. 800–825, Diarmait, Milan Glosses on the Psalms, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 7–483, Ml. 14d10
      Is samlid léicfimmi-ni doïbsom aisndís dint ṡéns ⁊ din mórálus, manip écóir frisin stoir ad·fíadam-ni.
      It is thus we shall leave to them the exposition of the sense and the morality, if it is not at variance with the history that we relate.

Usage notes[edit]

Used before lenited s.


Walloon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French dent, from Latin dēns, dentem.

Noun[edit]

dint f

  1. (anatomy) tooth