dort

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Dort and dört

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English dort (found in compound cankerdort), of unknown origin.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Rhymes: -ɔː(ɹ)t
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

dort (plural dorts)

  1. (UK dialectal, Northern England, Scotland) A sulky or sullen mood; the sulks.

Usage notes[edit]

  • Usually used in the plural, the dorts.

Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

dort (third-person singular simple present dorts, present participle dorting, simple past and past participle dorted)

  1. (intransitive) To become pettish; sulk.

Anagrams[edit]


Cimbrian[edit]

Preposition[edit]

dort

  1. Alternative form of dor

Czech[edit]

Etymology[edit]

German Torte

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

dort m

  1. cake

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • dort in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • dort in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989
  • dort in Internetová jazyková příručka

French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

dort

  1. third-person singular present indicative of dormir

Anagrams[edit]


German[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • dorten (dialectal or poetic; overall very rare)

Etymology[edit]

From Old High German doret.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /dɔrt/, [dɔʁt], [dɔɐ̯t], [dɔːt]
  • (file)

Adverb[edit]

dort

  1. there, yonder
    Synonym: da

Usage notes[edit]

  • Dort is seldom ever heard in non-formal speech in some regions of Germany, chiefly the west and north. The synonym da is overall more frequent, although dort is quite common in eastern Germany, southern Germany, and Austria.
  • In literary German, dort is usual in all regions.

Further reading[edit]

  • dort” in Duden online
  • dort” in Digitales Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache