yonder

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English yonder, yondre, ȝondre, ȝendre, from Old English ġeonre (thither; yonder, adverb), equivalent to yond (from Old English ġeond, from Proto-Germanic *jend-, *jand-) + -er, as in hither, thither. Cognate with Scots ȝondir (yonder), Dutch ginder (over there; yonder), Gothic 𐌾𐌰𐌹𐌽𐌳𐍂𐌴 (jaindrē, thither).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

yonder (not comparable)

  1. (archaic or dialectal) At or in a distant but indicated place.
    Whose doublewide is that over yonder?
  2. (archaic or dialectal) Synonym of thither: to a distant but indicated place.
    They headed on over yonder.

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Adjective[edit]

yonder (comparative more yonder, superlative most yonder)

  1. (archaic or dialectal, with "the") The farther, the more distant of two choices.

Synonyms[edit]

Determiner[edit]

yonder

  1. (archaic or dialectal, as an adj.) Who or which is over yonder, usually distant but within sight.
    • 1599, William Shakespeare, The Tragedie of Romeo and Iuliet (First Folio), Act II, Scene ii:
      But ſoft, what light through yonder window breaks?
      It is the Eaſt, and Iuliet is the Sunne...
    • 1826, Mary Shelley, The Last Man, Pt. II, ch. 2:
      Fire, the Sword, and Plagueǃ They may all be found in the yonder city; on my head alone may they fallǃ
    • 2006, Cécile Corbel (lyrics and music), “Siúil a Ruin”, in Songbook 1[1], Brittany: Keltia Musique, performed by Cécile Corbel:
      I wish I were on yonder hill
      and there I’d sit and I’d cry my fill,
      and ev’ry tear would turn a mill,
      And a blessing walk with you, my love
    Yonder lass, who be she?
  2. (archaic or dialectal, as a pron.) One who or which is over yonder, usually distant but within sight.
    The yonder is Queen Niobe.

Synonyms[edit]

  • (distant but within sight): yon

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

yonder (plural yonders)

  1. (literary) The vast distance, particularly the sky or trackless forest.

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References[edit]