yonder

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English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English yonder, yondre, ȝondre, ȝendre, from Old English ġeonre (thither; yonder, adverb), equivalent to yond (from ġeond, from Proto-Germanic *jainaz) + -er, as in hither, thither.
Cognate with Scots ȝondir (yonder), Saterland Frisian tjunder (over there, yonder), Dutch ginder (over there; yonder), Middle Low German ginder, gender (over there), German jenseits (on the other side, beyond),[1] Gothic 𐌾𐌰𐌹𐌽𐌳𐍂𐌴 (jaindrē, thither).[2]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

yonder (not comparable)

  1. (archaic or dialect) At or in a distant but indicated place.
    Whose doublewide is that over yonder?
  2. (archaic or dialect) Synonym of thither: to a distant but indicated place.
    They headed on over yonder.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Adjective[edit]

yonder (comparative more yonder, superlative most yonder)

  1. (archaic or dialect) The farther, the more distant of two choices.

Synonyms[edit]

Determiner[edit]

yonder

  1. (archaic or dialect, as an adjective) Who or which is over yonder, usually distant but within sight.
    Yonder lass, who be she?
  2. (archaic or dialect, as a pronoun) One who or which is over yonder, usually distant but within sight.
    The yonder is Queen Niobe.

Synonyms[edit]

  • (distant but within sight): yon

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

yonder (plural yonders)

  1. (literary) The vast distance, particularly the sky or trackless forest.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ https://www.dwds.de/wb/dwb/jener
  2. ^ yonder, adv., adj., pron., & n.”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, 1921.
  3. ^ Stanley, Oma (1937), “I. Vowel Sounds in Stressed Syllables”, in The Speech of East Texas (American Speech: Reprints and Monographs; 2), New York: Columbia University Press, →DOI, →ISBN, § 7, page 18.
  4. ^ Bingham, Caleb (1808), “Improprieties in Pronunciation, common among the people of New-England”, in The Child's Companion; Being a Conciſe Spelling-book [] [1], 12th edition, Boston: Manning & Loring, →OCLC, page 77.

Anagrams[edit]