yonder

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English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English yonder, yondre, ȝondre, ȝendre, from Old English ġeonre (thither; yonder, adverb), equivalent to yond (from ġeond, from Proto-Germanic *jainaz) + -er, as in hither, thither. Cognate with Scots ȝondir (yonder), Dutch ginder (over there; yonder), Gothic 𐌾𐌰𐌹𐌽𐌳𐍂𐌴 (jaindrē, thither).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

yonder (not comparable)

  1. (archaic or dialect) At or in a distant but indicated place.
    Whose doublewide is that over yonder?
  2. (archaic or dialect) Synonym of thither: to a distant but indicated place.
    They headed on over yonder.

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Adjective[edit]

yonder (comparative more yonder, superlative most yonder)

  1. (archaic or dialect) The farther, the more distant of two choices.
    • 1834, Letitia Elizabeth Landon, Francesca Carrara, volume 2, page 163:
      "You have all necessary proofs in your possession, though you may not be aware of their existence," replied Arden; "will you allow me to open yonder box?"

Synonyms[edit]

Determiner[edit]

yonder

  1. (archaic or dialect, as an adjective) Who or which is over yonder, usually distant but within sight.
    Yonder lass, who be she?
  2. (archaic or dialect, as a pronoun) One who or which is over yonder, usually distant but within sight.
    The yonder is Queen Niobe.

Synonyms[edit]

  • (distant but within sight): yon

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

yonder (plural yonders)

  1. (literary) The vast distance, particularly the sky or trackless forest.

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