frou-frou

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English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French frou-frou, an onomatopoeia.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /ˈfɹuːfɹuː/
  • Hyphenation: frou‧frou
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

frou-frou (plural frou-frous)

  1. (onomatopoeia) A rustling sound, particularly the rustling of a large silk dress.
    • 1870 June 4, Athenaeum, p. 734:
      The modern frou-frou of satin and gros-de-Naples skirts is nothing to the rustling of brocaded silks.
    • 1876, William Besant & al., The Golden Butterfly, Act I, Scene vi, l. 108:
      ...the frou-frou of life was lost to her...

Adjective[edit]

frou-frou (comparative more frou-frou, superlative most frou-frou)

  1. Liable to create the sound of rustling cloth, similar to 19th-century dresses.
  2. Highly ornamented, overly elaborate; excessively girly.
    They ate in a frou-frou restaurant at the top of a skyscraper.
  3. (derogatory) Unimportant, silly, useless.
    Bob was off faffing about doing frou-frou nonsense whilst Edwina kept her nose to the grindstone.

Verb[edit]

frou-frou (third-person singular simple present frou-frous, present participle frou-frouing, simple past and past participle frou-froued)

  1. (rare) To move with the sound of rustling dresses.
    • 1905 May 18, Truth, p. 1289:
      ...frou-frouing femininities...

Usage notes[edit]

Almost exclusively seen in the form frou-frouing.

References[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Imitative.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

frou-frou m (plural frous-frous)

  1. a frou-frou; a rustling sound, as of silk fabric

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • English: frou-frou
  • Portuguese: frufru

Further reading[edit]