gamin

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French gamin (street urchin; young boy),[1] apparently an “eastern dialect” word of unknown origin.[2]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gamin (plural gamins)

  1. (dated, also attributively) A homeless boy; a male street urchin; also (more generally), a cheeky, street-smart boy.
    Antonym: gamine (female)
    • 1854, Alexis [Benoît] Soyer, A Shilling Cookery for the People: Embracing an Entirely New System of Plain Cookery and Domestic Economy, London; New York, N.Y.: George Routledge & Co., OCLC 76167054, page 125:
      Dearest Eloise,— There is one little and perhaps insignificant French cake, which I feel certain would soon become a favourite in the cottage, more particularly amongst its juvenile inhabitants. It is the famed galette, the melodramatic food of the gamins, galopins, mechanics, and semi-artists of France.

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Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gamin m (plural gamins, feminine gamine)

  1. (dated) street urchin, street kid
  2. (colloquial) kid (a child, especially one who is mischievous or plays in the streets)

Adjective[edit]

gamin (feminine singular gamine, masculine plural gamins, feminine plural gamines)

  1. mischievous, naughty

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Limburgish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French gamin.

Noun[edit]

gamin m

  1. (Maastrichtian) rascal boy, an imp particularly inclined to mischief

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Middle English[edit]

Noun[edit]

gamin

  1. Alternative form of game