garnish

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English garnischen, from Old French garniss-, stem of certain forms of the verb garnir, guarnir, warnir ‎(to provide, furnish, avert, defend, warn, fortify, garnish), from a conflation of Old Frankish *warnjan ‎(to refuse, deny) and *warnōn ‎(warn, protect, prepare, beware, guard oneself), from Proto-Germanic *warnijaną ‎(to worry, care, heed) and Proto-Germanic *warnōną ‎(to warn); both from Proto-Indo-European *wer- ‎(to defend, protect, cover). Cognate with Old English wiernan ‎(to withhold, be sparing of, deny, refuse, reject, decline, forbid, prevent from, avert) and warnian ‎(to warn, caution, take warning, take heed, guard oneself against, deny). More at warn.

Verb[edit]

garnish ‎(third-person singular simple present garnishes, present participle garnishing, simple past and past participle garnished)

  1. To decorate with ornamental appendages; to set off; to adorn; to embellish.
    • Spenser
      All within with flowers was garnished.
  2. (cooking) To ornament, as a dish, with something laid about it; as, a dish garnished with parsley.
  3. To furnish; to supply.
    By his spirit he hath garnished the heavens; his hand hath formed the crooked serpent. (Job 26:13, KJV)
  4. (slang, archaic) To fit with fetters; to fetter
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Johnson to this entry?)
  5. (law) To warn by garnishment; to give notice to; to garnishee.

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Noun[edit]

garnish ‎(plural garnishes)

  1. A set of dishes, often pewter, containing a dozen pieces of several types.
  2. Pewter vessels in general.
    • 1882, James Edwin Thorold Rogers, A History of Agriculture and Prices in England, Volume 4, p. 478:
      The accounts of collegiate and monastic institutions give abundant entries of the price of pewter vessels, called also garnish.
  3. Something added for embellishment; decoration; ornament; also, dress; garments, especially when showy or decorated.
    • Shakespeare
      So are you, sweet, / Even in the lovely garnish of a boy.
    • Prior
      Matter and figure they produce; / For garnish this, and that for use.
  4. (cooking) Something set round or upon a dish as an embellishment.
  5. (slang, obsolete) Fetters.
  6. (slang, historical) A fee; specifically, in English jails, formerly an unauthorized fee demanded from a newcomer by the older prisoners.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Fielding to this entry?)

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

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Anagrams[edit]