infect

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French infect, from Latin infectus, perfect passive participle of inficiō (dye, taint).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ɪnˈfɛkt/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɛkt

Verb[edit]

infect (third-person singular simple present infects, present participle infecting, simple past and past participle infected)

  1. (transitive) To bring (the body or part of it) into contact with a substance that causes illness (a pathogen), so that the pathogen begins to act on the body; (of a pathogen) to come into contact with (a body or body part) and begin to act on it.
    Not everyone will be infected when an epidemic strikes.
    • 2013 May-June, Katie L. Burke, “In the News”, in American Scientist, volume 101, number 3, page 193:
      Bats host many high-profile viruses that can infect humans, including severe acute respiratory syndrome and Ebola.
  2. (transitive) To contaminate (an object or substance) with a pathogen.
  3. (transitive) To make somebody enthusiastic about one's own passion.
    Her passion for dancing has infected me.

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Adjective[edit]

infect (not comparable)

  1. (obsolete) Infected.

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin infectus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

infect (feminine singular infecte, masculine plural infects, feminine plural infectes)

  1. vile, loathsome
  2. revolting, disgusting

Synonyms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French infect, from Latin infectus.

Adjective[edit]

infect m or n (feminine singular infectă, masculine plural infecți, feminine and neuter plural infecte)

  1. revolting, disgusting (about smells)
  2. vile, loathsome (about humans)

Declension[edit]