midwinter

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English midwinter, from Old English midwinter, from Proto-West Germanic *midiwintru, from Proto-Germanic *midjawintruz (midwinter), equivalent to mid- +‎ winter. Cognate with West Frisian midwinter (midwinter), Dutch midwinter (midwinter), German Mittwinter (midwinter), Danish midvinter (midwinter), Swedish midvinter (midwinter).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˌmɪdˈwɪntə(ɹ)/

Noun[edit]

midwinter (countable and uncountable, plural midwinters)

  1. The middle of winter.
    • 1961 October, “The winter timetables of British Railways: Western Region”, in Trains Illustrated, page 590:
      Except for the mid-winter period, when the 11.30 a.m. from Paddington and its opposite number will be withdrawn - Torquay now has seven daily expresses to and from Paddington as compared with five down and six up previously.
  2. The winter solstice; about December 21st or 22nd.

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch middewinter, from Old Dutch [Term?], from Proto-West Germanic *midiwintru. Equivalent to mid- +‎ winter.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˌmɪtˈʋɪn.tər/
  • Hyphenation: mid‧win‧ter

Noun[edit]

midwinter m (plural midwinters)

  1. midwinter
  2. winter solstice, midwinter

See also[edit]


Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *midjaz wintruz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

midwinter m

  1. the middle of winter; midwinter
  2. Christmas

Usage notes[edit]

  • In cases other than the strong nominative singular, the prefix usually becomes the adjective midd and is inflected: Ne bēoþ nāne wilde blostman on midne winter (“There are no wildflowers in the middle of winter”). Middæġ (“noon”), midniht (midnight), and midsumor (midsummer) work the same way.

Declension[edit]