mosca

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See also: Mosca and mósca

Aragonese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun[edit]

mosca f (plural moscas)

  1. fly (insect)

References[edit]


Asturian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin musca.

Noun[edit]

mosca f (plural mosques)

  1. fly (insect)

Catalan[edit]

mosca

Etymology[edit]

From Old Catalan mosca, from Latin musca, from a Proto-Indo-European root *mus-, *mu-, *mew-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mosca f (plural mosques)

  1. fly (insect)

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Galician[edit]

Galician Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia gl
Galician Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia gl

Etymology[edit]

From Old Galician and Old Portuguese mosca, from Latin musca.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mosca f (plural moscas)

  1. fly (insect)
  2. (television) digital on-screen graphic

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • mosca” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006–2012.
  • mosca” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006–2016.
  • mosca” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006–2013.
  • mosca” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • mosca” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

Italian[edit]

Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia it

Etymology[edit]

From Latin musca, from a Proto-Indo-European root *mus-, *mu-, *mew-. Compare Spanish mosca.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mosca f (plural mosche)

  1. fly (insect)
    • 13th century, “De’ Funghi [Of Mushrooms]”, in Trattato dell'agricoltura [Treatise On Agriculture]‎[1], translation of Opus ruralium commodorum libri XII by Pietro De' Crescenzi, published 1605, page 326:
      [] quello è mortale, che tosto uccide, e chiamasi il fungo delle mosche, imperocchè, polverizzato in latte, uccide le mosche.
      That one is deadly, which kills at once, and it is called the "mushroom of the flies", because, if ground in milk, it kills the flies.
    • 1321, Dante Alighieri, La divina commedia: Inferno [The Divine Comedy: Hell] (paperback), 12th edition, Le Monnier, published 1994, Canto ⅩⅦ, lines 49–51, page 253:
      non altrimenti fan di state i cani ¶ or col ceffo or col piè, quando son morsi ¶ o da pulci o da mosche o da tafani
      Not unlike how dogs do during the summer, with the head or the leg, when they're bitten by fleas or flies or horseflies
    • 1668, Francesco Redi, Esperienze intorno alla generazione degl’insetti [Experiences About the Generation of Insects]‎[2], Florence, page 137:
      e pure io ho vedute le mosche partorir le loro uova ed i loro vermi nel timo, e da que’ vermi nascerne le mosche
      And yet, I've seen flies laying their eggs, and their larvae, amidst thyme, and flies being born from those larvae
  2. (transferred sense, figuratively):
    1. (fishing) fly (lure)
      • 1833, Nuovo dizionario universale tecnologico o di arti e mestieri - Tomo Ⅷ [New universal technological dictionary, or of arts and crafts - Volume 8], Venice: Giuseppe Antonelli ed., Mosca, page 461:
        Nell’arte della pesca, diconsi mosche certi insetti fittizi fatti alla buona per servire d’esca ai pesci.
        In the art of fishing, flies are a kind of improvised fake insects, made to serve as a lure for fish.
      • 1981, Carlo Cotta Ramusino, “Capitolo Ⅶ - Tecnica di lancio [Chapter 7 - Throwing technique]”, in Pesca a mosca: canne, lenze, mulinelli, setali, mosche, lanci da pesca e da gara[3], page 195:
        Premetto che se volete imparare a lanciare, non dovete pretendere di andare vicino all’acqua, montare la canna, attaccare la mosca e mettervi a pescare.
        I have to preface that, if you wish to learn to throw [the line], you mustn't expect to just go near water, assemble the rod, attach the fly, and start fishing.
    2. (historical, cosmetics) beauty spot
    3. soul patch (narrow beard)
    4. (in the plural) Black spots on a horse's coat.
    5. (bartending slang) A roasted coffee bean sometimes served with sambuca.
  3. (foundry) A small ball of plastic material used to verify the thickness of the various parts of a mold.
  4. (nautical, historical) aviso, advice boat
    Synonym: avviso

Derived terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

mosca m (invariable)

  1. (martial arts) Ellipsis of peso mosca.: a flyweight-class fighter.

References[edit]

  • mosca in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana

Leonese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun[edit]

mosca f (plural moscas)

  1. fly (insect)

References[edit]


Occitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Occitan mosca, from Latin musca.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mosca f (plural moscas)

  1. fly (insect)

Old Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin muscam, accusative of musca.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mosca f (plural moscas)

  1. fly
    • c. 1250: Alfonso X, Lapidario, f. 31v.
      Et ſi tomaren cinco moſcas o ſiete ¬ les tollieren las cabeças ¬ las machucaren con eſta piedra. ¬ las puſieren ſobre la ferida dela bieſpa, ſana luego ¬ faz perder la dolor.
      And if the took five flies, or seven, and they took their heads and crushed them with this stone, and they put them on a wasp sting, it would then heal it and alleviate the pain.

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Ladino: moshka (Latin spelling), מושקה(Hebrew spelling)
  • Spanish: mosca

Portuguese[edit]

mosca

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese mosca, from Latin musca, from a Proto-Indo-European root *mus-, *mu-, *mew-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mosca f (plural moscas)

  1. fly (insect)
  2. soul patch (narrow beard)

Related terms[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Spanish mosca, from Latin musca, from a Proto-Indo-European root *mus-, *mu-, *mew-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mosca f (plural moscas)

  1. fly (any insect of the order Diptera)
  2. (boxing) fly (boxing class)
  3. (television) digital on-screen graphic

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

mosca

  1. Informal second-person singular () affirmative imperative form of moscar.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present indicative form of moscar.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present indicative form of moscar.

Further reading[edit]