prowess

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English prowesse, prouwesse, prouesce, from Old French proeche, proesce, proeësche (goodness; excellence; bravery), from Old French prou, preu, prouz, pruz, proz (good; excellent; brave). Compare English proud.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

prowess (countable and uncountable, plural prowesses)

  1. Skillfulness and manual ability; adroitness or dexterity.
    • 2017 November 10, Daniel Taylor, “Youthful England earn draw with Germany but Lingard rues late miss”, in The Guardian (London)[1]:
      There is such a sense of inferiority sometimes when it comes to facing Germany, with all their World Cups, their penalty prowess and easy sophistication, it might come as a surprise to learn that, in head-to-head encounters, England actually match their opponents.
    • 1913, Ambrose Bierce, An Unfinished Race
      When in liquor he would make foolish wagers. On one of these too frequent occasions he was boasting of his prowess as a pedestrian and athlete, and the outcome was a match against nature. For a stake of one sovereign he undertook to run all the way to Coventry and back, a distance of something more than forty miles.
  2. Distinguished bravery or courage, especially in battle; heroism
    • 1917, Ella Wheeler Wilcox, England, Awake!
      Her smiling eyes see but the vanished time
      Of splendid prowess, and of deeds sublime.

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

References[edit]