rebut

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See also: rebût

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Inherited from Middle English [Term?], from Old French reboter, rebuter, rebouter, etc., from re- +‎ boter, buter, bouter (to butt). Entered English around 1302-1307.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

rebut (third-person singular simple present rebuts, present participle rebutting, simple past and past participle rebutted)

  1. To drive back or beat back; to repulse.
  2. To deny the truth of something, especially by presenting arguments that disprove it.
    • 1964 June, “News and Comment: Reprieve in the Far North”, in Modern Railways, page 373:
      Rebutting allegations that Scotland's railways had been deliberately run down, he pointed out that in the past nine years over £70m had been spent on their development.

Usage notes[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  • "rebut, v." listed in the Oxford English Dictionary (second edition, 1989)

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

rebut m (plural rebuts)

  1. receipt (acknowledgement that something has been received)
    Synonym: rebuda

Verb[edit]

rebut m (feminine rebuda, masculine plural rebuts, feminine plural rebudes)

  1. past participle of rebre

French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

rebut

  1. third-person singular past historic of reboire

Noun[edit]

rebut m (plural rebuts)

  1. (archaic) casting-off, throwing-away
  2. cast-off; scrap, rubbish
  3. scum, dreg
  4. dead letter

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French rebut.

Noun[edit]

rebut n (plural rebuturi)

  1. cast-off; scrap, rubbish

Declension[edit]