reysen

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Probably from Middle Dutch reisen, resen (compare Old English rāsian (to explore)), ultimately from Proto-Germanic *raisōną; equivalent to reys (journey) +‎ -en.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

reysen

  1. (rare, Late ME) To enter into service for a foreign military campaign.
    • a. 1400, Geoffrey Chaucer, “Prologue”, in The Canterbury Tales:
      In Lettow hadde he reysed, and in Ruce...
      He'd served in Lithuania and Russia...
  2. (rare, Late ME) To go on a journey or trip.
Conjugation[edit]
Descendants[edit]
References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse reisa, from Proto-Germanic *raisijaną, *raizijaną. Doublet of reren.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈrɛi̯zən/, /ˈrɛːzən/

Verb[edit]

reysen

  1. To raise; to hold up or suspend upwards:
    1. To cause to stand up; to induce to rise.
      • a. 1382, John Wycliffe, “John 8:10”, in Wycliffe's Bible:
        And Jhesus reiside hym silf, and seide to hir, Womman, where ben thei that accusiden thee? no man hath dampned thee?
        And Jesus raised himself, and said to her: "Woman, where are those who ostracised you? Has nobody ostracised you?"
    2. (late ME) To extract or pull out; to cause something to exit.
  2. To create or ready something:
    1. To ready or prepare; to activate or equip for use.
    2. To start or cause; to endow or grant.
    3. To (re)build or construct; to make or create.
      • a. 1382, John Wycliffe, “John 2:20”, in Wycliffe's Bible:
        Therfor the Jewis seiden to hym, In fourti and sixe yeer this temple was bildid, and schalt thou in thre daies reise it?
        Then the Jews said to him: "This temple was built in forty-six years, and you want to rebuild it in three days?"
    4. To summon a occult or demonic force.
  3. To revitalise; to revive:
    1. To spiritually improve or wake; to draw spiritual attention.
    2. To release from negative emotions, thoughts, or beliefs; to banish iniquity.
      • c. 1200, Ormin, “Homily 8”, in Ormulum:
        Forr he ras o þehhtennde daȝȝ / To reȝȝsenn uss off sinne
        For he rose on the eighth day / to cleanse us of sin
    3. To resurrect; to cause to come back from the dead.
      • a. 1382, John Wycliffe, “John 5:21”, in Wycliffe's Bible:
        For as the fadir reisith deed men, and quykeneth, so the sone quykeneth whom he wole.
        Just like when the father raises the dead and resurrects them, the son resurrects who he wants.
  4. To encourage, popularise or spread; to enhance or extol:
    1. To motivate; to spread inspiration or encouragement.
    2. To improve someone's reputation or glory; to extol the virtues of someone.
    3. To embolden; to instil pridefulness or boastfulness in someone.
    4. To ordain or found; to prepare.
  5. To request or requisition:
    1. To levy or request taxes; to charge fees or bills.
    2. To levy men; to raise trops or forces.
  6. To take away; to remove or grab out.
  7. To rile; to spread discontent or turmoil.
  8. To produce a sound or utterance.
Conjugation[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
References[edit]