rock and roll

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English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From rock (move back and forth) + and + roll; originally a verb phrase common among African Americans, meaning "to have sexual intercourse"; it was a euphemism that appeared in song titles since at least 1914 (Trixie Smith's "My Man Rocks Me With One Steady Roll").

As a name for a specific style of popular music from the early 1950s, popularized by disc jockey Alan Freed in reference to the euphemistic use in song titles.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈɹɒk ən(d) ˈɹəʊl/; see usage note
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

rock and roll (uncountable)

  1. (music) A genre of popular music that evolved in the 1950s from a combination of rhythm and blues and country music, characterized by electric guitars, strong rhythms, and youth-oriented lyrics.
  2. (dance) A style of vigorous dancing associated with this genre of music.
  3. (especially attributive) An intangible feeling, philosophy, belief or allegiance relating to rock music, characterized by unbridled enthusiasm, hedonism, and cynical regard for authoritarian bodies.
    rock and roll lifestyle
  4. (Cockney rhyming slang) Dole, payment by the state to the unemployed.
    I'm back on rock and rollI'm back on the dole.
  5. (military, slang, US) The full automatic fire capability selection on a selective fire weapon.
  6. (film, television) The ability to run the picture and audio back and forth in synchronization, allowing the correction of mistakes during dubbing.
    • 2004, Robert Angell, Getting Into Films & Television (page 56)
      The dubbing theatre is a viewing theatre equipped for running the picture with a great many tracks interlocked to run synchronously. Once laced up, they can be run forwards or backwards remaining in synch; when it was first introduced this system was given the name 'rock and roll'.
    • 2012, Colin Hart, Television Program Making (page 196)
      It is very rare that an entire commentary is recorded in one take. If you need to stop for some reason — the performance isn't quite right, there's a rustle of papers, etc — you can always go back on the recording and pick it up from the point at which it went wrong. This is known as rock and roll.
    • 2014, K. G. Jackson, G. B. Townsend, TV & Video Engineer's Reference Book (page 38-7)
      An alternative method is the use of ADR (automated dialogue replacement), which consists basically of a high speed rock and roll dubbing system and a programmable locating device.

Usage notes[edit]

  • When pronounced, the word "and" in this phrase, as in many others, is frequently reduced to a mere /ən/ or /n/ (i.e. pronounced "rok-an-roll" or "raw-kn-roll). When this occurs, it is often reflected in contracted spellings like rock 'n' roll (see alternative forms above).
  • Rock and roll is sometimes taken to encompass a particular style of music from roughly the mid-40s to the middle of the 1960s. It is otherwise taken to be largely synonymous with rock music, which encompasses a much wider range of more modern styles.

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

rock and roll (third-person singular simple present rocks and rolls or rock and rolls, present participle rocking and rolling or rock and rolling, simple past and past participle rocked and rolled or rock and rolled)

  1. (dated slang, euphemistic, 1920s, African-American Vernacular) To have sex.
    Synonyms: bang, do it; see also Thesaurus:copulate
  2. To play rock and roll music.
    Synonym: rock
  3. To start, commence, begin, get moving.
    Synonyms: initiate, open; see also Thesaurus:begin
    Does everyone know what car they're going in? Then let's rock and roll!
    • 2017, Ben J. Heijdra, Foundations of Modern Macroeconomics (3rd ed.), Oxford University Press, p. 484
      Now we are ready to rock and roll.

References[edit]

  • 2001. The Garland Encyclopedia of World Music: North America. Garland Publishing. Ellen Koskoff (Ed.). Pg. 347.

Polish[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Unadapted borrowing from English rock and roll.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

rock and roll m inan

  1. rock and roll (style of music)
  2. rock and roll (style of vigorous dancing associated with this genre of music)

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

adjective
noun

Further reading[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Unadapted borrowing from English rock and roll.

Pronunciation[edit]

 

Noun[edit]

rock and roll m (uncountable)

  1. (music) rock and roll (style of music)
    Synonym: rock

Related terms[edit]


Romanian[edit]

Noun[edit]

rock and roll n (uncountable)

  1. rock and roll

Spanish[edit]

Noun[edit]

rock and roll m (uncountable)

  1. rock and roll

Further reading[edit]