tripe

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: tripé

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English tripe, from Old French tripe (entrails), of uncertain origin; possibly borrowed from Spanish tripa.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /tɹaɪp/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -aɪp

Noun[edit]

tripe (usually uncountable, plural tripes)

  1. The lining of the large stomach of ruminating animals, when prepared for food.
    Coordinate term: chitterlings
    • 1922 February, James Joyce, “[1]”, in Ulysses, London: The Egoist Press, published October 1922, OCLC 2297483:
      You saw only your mother die. I see them pop off every day in the Mater and Richmond and cut up into tripes in the dissectingroom.
  2. (chiefly in the plural) The entrails; hence, humorously or in contempt, the belly.
  3. (figuratively, derogatory) Something foolish or valueless, especially written works and popular entertainment (movies, television).
    • 1932, Clarence Budington Kelland, Speak Easily, spoken by Stage Director (Sidney Toler):
      No, I'm not kidding. Professor, Broadway stands for a lot of baloney; but, it will never digest a piece of tripe like this!
    • 1984, Dan Aykroyd; Harold Ramis, Ghostbusters, spoken by Dean Yeager (Jordan Charney):
      We believe that the purpose of science is to serve mankind. You, however, seem to regard science as some kind of dodge… or hustle. Your theories are the worst kind of popular tripe, your methods are sloppy, and your conclusions are highly questionable! You are a poor scientist, Dr. Venkman!
    • 2022 April 26, Stephen Castle; Megan Specia, quoting Boris Johnson, “U.K. Tabloid Accuses Lawmaker of ‘Basic Instinct’ Move, Highlighting Sexism in Parliament”, in The New York Times[1], ISSN 0362-4331:
      It was dismissed by Mr. Johnson as “sexist, misogynist, tripe,” and prompted more than 5,500 complaints, according to the independent regulator of most of Britain’s newspapers and magazines.
  4. An edible lichen, especially rock tripe.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Interjection[edit]

tripe

  1. (derogatory) That (what has just been said) is untrue.

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French tripe.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

tripe f (plural tripes)

  1. tripe

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Old French tripe; further etymology is uncertain (compare Italian trippa, Spanish tripa).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

tripe (plural tripes)

  1. A portion of a creature's entrails or organs (often as food).

Descendants[edit]

  • English: tripe
  • Scots: tripe

References[edit]


Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French tripe (entrails).

Noun[edit]

tripe f (uncountable)

  1. (Jersey) tripe

Portuguese[edit]

Verb[edit]

tripe

  1. inflection of tripar:
    1. first/third-person singular present subjunctive
    2. third-person singular imperative