aberrant

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin aberrāns, present active participle of aberrō (go astray; err), from ab (from) + errō (to wander).[1] See aberr[2].

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) IPA(key): /əˈbɛr.n̩t/, /ˈæ.bər.n̩t/
  • (US) IPA(key): /əbˈɛɹ.n̩t/, /ˈæ.bər.n̩t/

Adjective[edit]

aberrant (comparative more aberrant, superlative most aberrant)

  1. (obsolete) Differing from the norm. [Attesting from the mid 16th century until the early 17th century.][3]
  2. (literally figuratively) Straying from the right way; deviating from morality or truth. [First attested in the mid 18th century.][3]
  3. (botany, zoology) Deviating from the ordinary or natural type; exceptional; abnormal. [First attested in the mid 19th century.][3]
    • Charles Darwin,
      The more aberrant any form is, the greater must have been the number of connecting forms which, on my theory, have been exterminated.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Noun[edit]

aberrant (plural aberrants)

  1. A person or object that deviates from what is normal in his group.
  2. (biology) A group, individual, or structure that deviates from the usual or natural type, especially with an atypical chromosone number.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Aberrant at Dictionary.com
  2. ^ “aberrant” in the Webster's New Collegiate Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, 1974 edition.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 Lesley Brown (editor), The Shorter Oxford English Dictionary, 5th edition (Oxford University Press, 2003 [1933], ISBN 978-0-19-860575-7), page 4

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin aberrant-, stem of aberrāns, present active participle of aberrō (go astray; err).

Adjective[edit]

aberrant m, f (masculine and feminine plural aberrants)

  1. aberrant
  2. (pathology) aberrant (indicating an organ or other tissue which is not in its expected location)

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin aberrant-, stem of aberrāns, present active participle of aberrō (go astray; err).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

aberrant m (feminine aberrante, masculine plural aberrants, feminine plural aberrantes)

  1. Aberrant, abnormal or anomalous.
  2. (sciences) Which is impossible according to the norms or rules.

German[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

aberrant (comparative aberranter, superlative am aberrantesten)

  1. aberrant

Declension[edit]


Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

aberrant

  1. third-person plural present active indicative of aberrō