clamor

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English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Recorded in English since c. 1385, from Old French clamor (modern clameur), from Latin clāmor (a shout, cry), from clāmō (cry out, complain); the sense to silence may have a distinct (unknown) etymology.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

clamor (plural clamors)

  1. A great outcry or vociferation; loud and continued shouting or exclamation.
  2. Any loud and continued noise.
  3. A continued public expression, often of dissatisfaction or discontent; a popular outcry.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Verb[edit]

clamor (third-person singular simple present clamors, present participle clamoring, simple past and past participle clamored)

  1. (intransitive) To cry out and/or demand.
    Anyone who tastes our food seems to clamor for more.
  2. (transitive) To demand by outcry.
    Thousands of demonstrators clamoring the government's resignation were literally deafening, yet their cries fell in deaf ears
    • 2013 September 28, Kenan Malik, "London Is Special, but Not That Special," New York Times (retrieved 28 September 2013):
      The distinctness of London has led many to clamor for the capital to pursue its own policies, especially on immigration. The British prime minister, David Cameron, is a Conservative. So is the mayor of London, Boris Johnson. But they have diametrically opposed views on immigration.
  3. (intransitive) To become noisy insistently.
    After a confused murmur the audience soon clamored
  4. (transitive) To influence by outcry.
    His many supporters successfully clamor his election without a formal vote
  5. (obsolete, transitive) To silence.

Synonyms[edit]

  • (to cry out): din

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin clāmor (a shout, cry), from clāmō (cry out, complain).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

clamor m, f (plural clamors)

  1. clamor

Synonyms[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From clāmō (complain, cry out)

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

clāmor m (genitive clāmōris); third declension

  1. A shout, shouting.
  2. An acclamation, applause.
  3. A clamor, cry.
  4. A noise, sound

Inflection[edit]

Third declension.

Number Singular Plural
nominative clāmor clāmōrēs
genitive clāmōris clāmōrum
dative clāmōrī clāmōribus
accusative clāmōrem clāmōrēs
ablative clāmōre clāmōribus
vocative clāmor clāmōrēs

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Old French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

clamor m (oblique plural clamors, nominative singular clamors, nominative plural clamor)

  1. clamor (continued shouting and uproar)

Descendants[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Noun[edit]

clamor m (plural clamores)

  1. din (loud noise)

Synonyms[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Noun[edit]

clamor m (plural clamores)

  1. A clamor, shout.
  2. A protest, outcry.
  3. A loud noise.