cordial

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English[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

From Middle French cordial (stimulating the heart), from Late Latin cordialis, from cor.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈkɔː.dɪ.əl/, /ˈkɔː.dʒəl/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈkɔɹ.dɪ.əl/, /ˈkɔɹ.dʒəl/, /ˈkɔɹ.djəl/
  • (file)

Adjective[edit]

cordial (comparative more cordial, superlative most cordial)

  1. Hearty; sincere; warm; affectionate.
    • 1667, John Milton, Paradise Lost, 1859, Thomas Keightley (editor), The Poems of John Milton, Volume 1, page 381,
      He, on his side / Leaning half raised, with looks of cordial love / Hung over her enamoured.
    • 1885, George Washington Schuyler, Colonial New York: Philip Schuyler and His Family, C. Scribner's Sons,
      The relations between the Earl of Bellomont and Colonel Schuyler were formal, but not cordial from the first.
  2. Said of someone radiating warmth and friendliness; genial.
  3. (rare) Tending to revive, cheer, or invigorate; giving strength or spirits.
    • 1634, John Milton, Comus, 1853, John Mitford (editor), The Poetical Works of John Milton, Volume 3, page 106,
      And first behold this cordial julep here / That flames and dances in his crystal bounds, / With spirits of balm, and fragrant syrups mix'd.
  4. (obsolete) Proceeding from the heart.
    • 1667, John Milton, Paradise Lost, 1957, Merritt Yerkes Hughes (editor), Complete Poems and Major Prose, page 373,
      Who stooping op'n'd my left side, and took / From thence a Rib with cordial spirits warm, / And Life-blood streaming fresh;

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Noun[edit]

cordial (plural cordials)

  1. (UK, Australia, New Zealand) A concentrated noncarbonated soft drink which is diluted with water before drinking.
  2. (UK, Australia, New Zealand) An individual serving of such a diluted drink.
  3. A pleasant-tasting medicine.
  4. A liqueur prepared using the infusion process.
    • 1728, John Gay, The Beggar's Opera, Act III, Scene 1, in 1828, British Theatre, Comprising Tragedies, Comedies, Operas, and Farces, 827,
      Lucy. But, miss Polly—in the way of friendship, will you give me leave to propose a glass of cordial to you ?
      Polly. Strong waters are apt to give me the headache.—I hope, madam, you will excuse me?
    • 1908, Lucy Maud Montgomery, Anne of Green Gables, L. C. Page & Co.
      [Marilla] had put the bottle of raspberry cordial down in the cellar instead of in the closet [...].
  5. A candy (or bonbon) usually made of milk chocolate, filled with small fruits (often maraschino cherries) and syrup or fondant.

Hypernyms[edit]

Translations[edit]


French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

cordial m (feminine cordiale, masculine plural cordiaux, feminine plural cordiales)

  1. Coming from the heart; sincere.
  2. (archaic) Stimulating the heart; tonic.

Derived terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

cordial m (plural cordiaaux)

  1. cordial
  2. (medicine, obsolete) stimulant

External links[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Adjective[edit]

cordial m, f (plural cordiais; comparable)

  1. cordial (sincere; affectionate)

Romansch[edit]

Adjective[edit]

cordial

  1. sincere
  2. cordial

Derived terms[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Adjective[edit]

cordial m, f (plural cordiales)

  1. cordial

Derived terms[edit]