dug

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

dug (plural dugs)

  1. (chiefly in the plural) Mammary gland on domestic mammal containing more than two breasts.

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

dug

  1. simple past tense and past participle of dig

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Danish Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia da

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse dǫgg (dew), from Proto-Germanic *dawwō (dew), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰew- (to flow, run). Cognate with German Tau (dew). More at dew.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /duɡ/, [d̥uɡ̊]

Noun[edit]

dug c (singular definite duggen, not used in plural form)

  1. dew

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse dúkr.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /duːɡ/, [d̥uːˀ]

Noun[edit]

dug c (singular definite dugen, plural indefinite duge)

  1. tablecloth (a cloth used to cover and protect a table, especially for a dining table)
  2. a piece of canvas or cloth
  3. a piece of bunting (material from which flags are made)
Derived terms[edit]
Inflection[edit]

Hungarian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

dug

  1. to insert; push in
  2. to hide, conceal
  3. (informal) to have sex

Conjugation[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

With verb prefixes

Synonyms[edit]


Lojban[edit]

Rafsi[edit]

dug

  1. rafsi of dugri.

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Verb[edit]

dug

  1. imperative of duga and duge

Scots[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

dug (plural dugs)

  1. dog.

Verb[edit]

tae dug (third-person singular simple present dugs, present participle duggin, simple past duggit, past participle duggit)

  1. To stand up to; to outlast.

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *dъlgъ.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

dȗg m (Cyrillic spelling ду̑г)

  1. debt
Declension[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *dьlgъ.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

dȕg (definite dȕgī, comparative dȕžī, Cyrillic spelling ду̏г)

  1. long
Declension[edit]

Swedish[edit]

Verb[edit]

dug

  1. imperative of duga.