flute

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See also: flûte and flûté

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old French flaute, from Provençal flaut, ultimately from three possibilities:

  • Blend of Provencal flaujol (flageolet) + laut (lute)
  • From Latin flare (to blow)
  • Imitative.

Noun[edit]

flute (woodwind instrument)

flute (plural flutes)

  1. (music) A woodwind instrument consisting of a metal, wood or bamboo tube with a row of circular holes and played by blowing across a hole in the side of one end or through a narrow channel at one end against a sharp edge, while covering none, some or all of the holes with the fingers to vary the note played.
    • Alexander Pope
      The breathing flute's soft notes are heard around.
  2. A glass with a long, narrow bowl and a long stem, used for drinking wine, especially champagne.
  3. a lengthwise groove, such as one of the lengthwise grooves on a classical column, or a groove on a cutting tool (such as a drill bit, endmill, or reamer), which helps to form both a cutting edge and a channel through which chips can escape
  4. (architecture, firearms) A semicylindrical vertical groove, as in a pillar, in plaited cloth, or in a rifle barrel to cut down the weight.
  5. A long French bread roll.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Simonds to this entry?)
  6. An organ stop with a flute-like sound.
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Verb[edit]

fluted pillars

flute (third-person singular simple present flutes, present participle fluting, simple past and past participle fluted)

  1. (intransitive) To play on a flute.
  2. (intransitive) To make a flutelike sound.
  3. (transitive) To utter with a flutelike sound.
    • 1960, P. G. Wodehouse, Jeeves in the Offing, chapter XIII:
      “Oh, there's my precious Poppet,” said Phyllis, as a distant barking reached the ears. “He's asking for his dinner, the sweet little angel. All right, darling, Mother's coming,” she fluted, and buzzed off on the errand of mercy.
  4. (transitive) To form flutes or channels in (as in a column, a ruffle, etc.); to cut a semicylindrical vertical groove in (as in a pillar, etc.).
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Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Compare French flûte (a transport)?, Dutch fluit.

Noun[edit]

flute (plural flutes)

  1. A kind of flyboat; a storeship.

External links[edit]


French[edit]

Noun[edit]

flute f (plural flutes)

  1. Alternative spelling of flûte.

German[edit]

Verb[edit]

flute

  1. First-person singular present of fluten.
  2. First-person singular subjunctive I of fluten.
  3. Third-person singular subjunctive I of fluten.
  4. Imperative singular of fluten.