fus

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See also: fús and fûs

Albanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Albanian *sputja, from Proto-Indo-European *pHu-tó- (compare Serbo-Croatian pítati ‘to ask’, Tocharian B putk- ‘to divide, share’, Latin putāre ‘to prune’)

Verb[edit]

fus (first-person singular past tense futa, participle futur)

  1. I insert, I put (something) in

Aromanian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin fūsus.

Noun[edit]

fus

  1. spindle

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin fūsus.

Noun[edit]

fus m (plural fusos)

  1. spindle

Derived terms[edit]


French[edit]

Verb[edit]

fus

  1. First-person singular past historic of être
  2. Second-person singular past historic of être

Jèrriais[edit]

Verb[edit]

fus

  1. first-person singular preterite of êt'

Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English fūs see below

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

fus

  1. ready, eager, striving forward, inclined to, willing, prompt
    Of vr saul to be ai fus Again þe com, þat es sa crus.Cursor Mundi, 1400
  2. ardent, zealous, passionate, expectant, brave, noble: ready to depart, die; dying
    Þaa foles feluns þat war fuus All vmlapped loth huse.Cursor Mundi, 1400

Related terms[edit]

  • fusen — to urge on or exhort

Descendants[edit]


Old Dutch[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *fuhsaz.

Noun[edit]

fus m

  1. fox

Descendants[edit]


Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *funsaz (ready, willing). Cognate with Old Saxon fūs, Old High German funs, Old Norse fúss.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fūs n

  1. A hastening, progress
    Se de leófra manna fús feor wlátode. — He who beheld afar the dear men's progress.

Declension[edit]

Adjective[edit]

fūs

  1. ready, eager, striving forward, inclined to, willing, prompt
    Se ðe stód fús on faroþe. — He who stood ready on the beach.
  2. expectant, brave, noble: ready to depart, die; dying

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]

  • fȳsan — to send forth, impel, stimulate: drive away, put to flight, banish: (usu. reflex.) hasten, prepare oneself
  • fȳsian, fēsian — to drive away

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin fūsus.

Noun[edit]

fus n (plural fuse)

  1. spindle
  2. shaft

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]