heed

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See also: Heed

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English hēden, from Old English hēdan (to heed, take care, observe, attend, guard, take charge, take possession, receive), from Proto-Germanic *hōdijaną (to heed, guard), from Proto-Indo-European *kadʰ- (to heed, protect). Cognate with West Frisian hoedje (to heed), Dutch hoeden (to heed), German hüten (to heed).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

heed (uncountable)

  1. Careful attention.
    • 1898, J. Meade Falkner, Moonfleet Chapter 4
      Then for a few minutes I did not pay much heed to what was said, being terribly straitened for room, and cramped with pain from lying so long in one place.

Usage notes[edit]

  • Often used with give, pay or take.

Synonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

heed (third-person singular simple present heeds, present participle heeding, simple past and past participle heeded)

  1. (transitive) To mind; to regard with care; to take notice of; to attend to; to observe.
    • Dryden
      With pleasure Argus the musician heeds.
    • 2013 September 23, Masha Gessen, "Life in a Russian Prison," New York Times (retrieved 24 September 2013):
      Tolokonnikova not only tried to adjust to life in the penal colony but she even tried to heed the criticism levied at her by colony representatives during a parole hearing.
  2. (intransitive, archaic) To pay attention, care.

Translations[edit]

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Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English hēafod.

Noun[edit]

heed (plural heeds)

  1. head (anatomy)

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

p. 1, Arthur; A Short Sketch of his Life and History in English Verse of the First Half of the Fifteenth Century, Frederick Furnivall ed. EETS. Trübner & Co.: London. 1864.