Godspeed

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: godspeed, God-speed, and God speed

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English phrase God spede (may God cause you to succeed), from God (God) + spede, singular subjunctive of speden (to prosper), from Old English spēdan, from spēd (success) (see English speed).

Pronunciation[edit]

Interjection[edit]

Godspeed

  1. The wish that the outcome of someone's actions is positive for them, typically someone about to start a journey or a daring endeavor.
    • M.K. Gandhi, The Story of My Experiments with Truth, translated by Mahadev Desai, Part I, chapter xi:
      I arrived at last, did obeisance to my uncle, and told him everything. He thought it over and said: ' [] At the threshold of death, how dare I give you permission to go to England, to cross the seas? But I will not stand in your way. It is your mother's permission which really matters. If she permit you, then godspeed! Tell her I will not interfere. You will go with my blessings.'
    • 1962 February 20, Scott Carpenter, (Please provide the book title or journal name):
      Godspeed, John Glenn.
    • 2007 May 12, Steinfels, Peter, “At Commencement, a Call for Religious Literacy”, in New York Times[1]:
      And godspeed.

Noun[edit]

Godspeed (plural Godspeeds)

  1. A statement of wishing someone a prosperous journey, or success.
    • 1678, John Bunyan, The Pilgrim's Progress:
      Evangelist, after he had kissed him, gave him one smile, and bid him God-speed.
    • 1848, Anne Brontë, The Tenant of Wildfell Hall:
      "I'm wishing you God-speed, Hattersley," cried Arthur, "and aiding you with my prayers."
    • 1879, Henry James, Roderick Hudson:
      Rowland at the garden gate was giving his hostess Godspeed on her way to church.
    • 1884 November 2, “Thon”, in The Critic and Good Literature[2], number 44, page 210:
      The new word has received a number of godspeeds, some of which we quote.
    • 1914, James Joyce, Dubliners:
      Eight years before he had seen his friend off at the North Wall and wished him God-speed.

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]