Talk:cock

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misc[edit]

I am unsure of the usefulness of marking homophones, but if we are to do it, do we need a way of showing the situation (quite commonly encountered) where two words are homophones in some accents but not others? "Caulk" is by no stretch of the imagination a homophone of "cock" in most (all?) British English accents, in most of which (however) "caulk" and "cork" are actually homophones. So should we have "homphones: caulk (US)"? Or perhaps "caulk" and "cock" are homophones in some and not all US accents? Amatlexico

Hmm according to dictionary.com, which often gives both (US) pronunciations for such words, cock only has one pronunciation. But I don't know since I'm Australian. I've already added a couple of homophones in this way so I've ammended this one too in the way I think would be useful. Hippietrail 11:35, 9 Feb 2004 (UTC)
Why is vagina given as one of the possible meanings of this word? Is this actually supported by slang dictionaries? It smacks of irony to me.
Karmosin 22:19, 26 January 2006 (UTC)

So am I to take from this that only people from the United States with negroid features use the word "cock" to mean a penis? This dictionary is absurd. 222.153.169.32 12:20, 15 February 2006 (UTC)

cock and vagina[edit]

I have no idea why the people from the south in the USA of both white and black would refer to the VaJJ as cock but I can assure you that they did. I'm from the north USA and was quite amused to hear them say "Lets go out tonight and get some cock". I admit this was some years ago however it was common all over the southern portion of the USA.

That’s true. Being from Texas, I didn’t know that cock meant penis until I joined the Army. It’s the reason that we could not understood how "cocksucker" could be a derogatory name for a man, since that was what most men fantasized about. —Stephen 10:28, 8 October 2007 (UTC)
I'm several years late to this but it should be noted that this usage is borne out by the explicit version of "Shave 'Em Dry" by the blues singer Lucille Bogan, which is available on YouTube and such. Towards the end she refers to her "cock" in terms that make it clear she is referring to her lady-part rather than claiming to be male! Keresaspa (talk) 01:40, 22 April 2016 (UTC)

Here's the cite:

  • 1935 March 5, Lucille Bogan, Shave 'em dry:
    I got nipples on my titties, big as the end of my thumb, / I got somethin' between my legs'll make a dead man come, / [...] And your dick stands up like a steeple, / [...] My back is made of whalebone, / And my cock is made of brass, / And my fuckin' is made for workin' men's two dollars[.]

- -sche (discuss) 03:34, 22 April 2016 (UTC)

Discussion continues at Wiktionary:Tea_room/2016/April#cock_meaning_vagina. - -sche (discuss) 03:59, 22 April 2016 (UTC)
She uses it again in the similarly themed "Till The Cows Come Home" BTW. Keresaspa (talk) 01:32, 23 April 2016 (UTC)
Indeed; here's that lyric, where she equates "cock" with "pussy":
  • 1933(–35?), Lucille Bogan, Till the cows come home:
    I told him I gotta good cock / and it's got four damn good names:
    Rough top, / rough cock, / tough cock, / cock without a bone.
    [] If you suck my pussy, / baby, I'll suck your dick.
Stephen Cait's Barrelhouse Words: A Blues Dialect Dictionary, like Silverton, confirms that Bogan meant vagina. Cait says "It is not known how cock (which has stood for penis since c. 1600; cf. F&H, 1891) acquired" such a different sense. Various sources assert that it was in use since at least the 1920s, and remained until at least the 1960s. I have put a copy of the Tea Room thread below. - -sche (discuss) 17:21, 6 June 2017 (UTC)
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On Talk:cock, one IP and one admin mention familiarity with an old Southern US usage of "cock" to mean "vagina", and another user provided (enough data that I tracked down) a citation of the usage from Lucille Bogan, where the meaning is confirmed by Peter Silverton, quoted here as saying "To [Bogan], what she had between her legs was a ‘cock’ – as it was for other southern [U.S.] women of her age, color and linguistic directness. [...] The female cock was a southern U.S. thing. It was the most common slang word for the vagina for a very long time. As late as the 1960s, in the southern states, ‘a piece of cock’ was a woman." Can anyone find more citations of this usage?
This site suggests it was in use at least as early as 1920, and "possibly derived from cockles; a cock-opener was a penis." It quotes the Dictionary of American Regional English (1985) as saying "At a point roughly the same as the Mason-Dixon Line, there is a division in meaning, to the North cock refers to the male genitals, but in the South its use is restricted to the female genitals. Missouri is a border state in which both meanings are used." Cassell's Dictionary of Slang also has it and derives it from French coquille.
- -sche (discuss) 03:57, 22 April 2016 (UTC)

I thought this was going to be incredibly hard to cite—dated regional slang spelled the same way as a much more common word with a related meaning. But actually, searching for "her cock" plus "ain't" on Google Books turned up a bunch of cites that look good. Here are some quotes from blues musician Piano Red; the commentary on pages 51-52 gives some more sociolinguistic information about this sense and derives it from cockle. And here is a quote from someone named "Mrs. H. K." (this book also says that the sense comes from French coquille). [1], [2], [3] also seem to be the sense we want. —Granger (talk · contribs) 19:54, 6 June 2017 (UTC)
Wow! This is a good example of how many books are added to Google every year, since I waded through pages and pages of hits for "her cock" last year, when I made my most exhaustive effort to cite this, and didn't find anything relevant — I gave up on it as a search term and didn't (re)try it when I re-searched for this yesterday. It must also be an example of Google's weird location-dependent results, since some of those don't show up even when I search for exact phrases from them, though with a bit of a workaround I can see your links. Using your smart addition of "ain't" to "her cock", I do see African American Slang: A Linguistic Description, by Maciej Widawski, which asserts the term isn't even dated, giving examples from 1998 ("I stuck my fist up in her cock") through 2013 (a tweet). o.O I wonder why other references said it had fallen out of use. - -sche (discuss) 04:07, 7 June 2017 (UTC)

Stupid[edit]

What would be an accurate definition of "cocking about" than just being stupid, this is a Top Gear quote so obviously the term is from england. The complete quote is : ' We are in fact on the cutting edge of cocking about"

"alt name for fucking around". — LlywelynII 11:57, 16 March 2017 (UTC)

Hungarian[edit]

Well, 'kakas' was added to the translations that should be checked. It means rooster. So not every male bird, just rooster. But one of cock's meanings is rooster. Aargh, I know, and I think even you do, but I can't explain better. What should I do? Where should I put 'kakas'? --Ferike333 17:08, 26 March 2009 (UTC)

As you have it, under "male gallinaceous bird". Male gallinaceous bird could also mean a turkey tom, and so if kakas is only a male chicken, then you could put "(rooster only)" after it in parentheses. I really don’t think "cock" in English is usually applied to turkey toms either, but usually only to the male of any chicken species (including the little ones such as bantam). —Stephen 21:49, 27 March 2009 (UTC)

Referring to a dog[edit]

Which sense fits this poem? I think it might just be a generic term for a person or individual, though it's a dog here. Equinox 20:03, 15 November 2015 (UTC)

  • James Payn, On Our Dog Jock
    A rollicksome frolicsome rare old cock
    As ever did nothing was our dog Jock;
    A gleesome fleasome affectionate beast,
    As slow at a fight, as swift at a feast []

Rooster[edit]

Difficult to search since cock obviously shows up in its additional senses. If people prefer cock be the main entry and have a good way of verifying it's still more common (It isn't where I'm from, but that may have to do with American prudishness), it's fine that the translations be listed here instead... but we should only have one list for male chicken/chickenish bird and not badly maintained duplicate lists like we had before. — LlywelynII 12:35, 16 March 2017 (UTC)