accrue

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) IPA(key): /əˈkɹuː/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ə.ˈkɹu/
  • (file)
  • (file)
    Rhymes: -uː

Verb[edit]

accrue (third-person singular simple present accrues, present participle accruing, simple past and past participle accrued)

  1. (intransitive) To increase, to rise
  2. (intransitive) to reach or come to by way of increase; to arise or spring up because of growth or result, especially as the produce of money lent.
    • 1879, Benjamin Vaughan Abbott, Dictionary of Terms and Phrases used in American or English Jurisprudence: ACCRUE
      Interest accrues to principal.
    • 1772, Junius, The Letters of Junius, Preface
      The great and essential advantages accruing to society from the freedom of the press
  3. (intransitive, accounting) To be incurred as a result of the passage of time.
    The monthly financial statements show all the actual but only some of the accrued expenses.
  4. (transitive) to accumulate
    He has accrued nine sick days.
    • 1709, John Dryden, "Lucretius: A Poem against the Fear of Death" (lines 26-29), published in a pamphlet of the same name with an Ode in Memory of Mrs. Ann Killebrew:
      We, who are dead and gone, shall bear no Part,
      In all the Pleasures, no shall we feel the smart,
      Which to that other Mortal shall accrew,
      Whom of our Matter Time shall mould anew.
  5. (intransitive, law) To become an enforceable and permanent right.

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

accrue (plural accrues)

  1. (obsolete) Something that accrues; advantage accruing

Translations[edit]

Further reading[edit]


French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

accrue f (plural accrues)

  1. dry land created by draining

Participle[edit]

accrue f sg

  1. feminine singular of the past participle of accroître

Further reading[edit]