acetabulum

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See also: acétabulum

English[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

Learned borrowing from Latin acētābulum (vinegar saucer, 1/48 congius), from acētum (vinegar) + -bulum (-bule: a vessel for).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

acetabulum (plural acetabulums or acetabula)

  1. (anatomy) The bony cup of the pelvis which receives the head of the femur.
  2. (zootomy) The cavity in which the leg of an insect is inserted at its articulation with the body.
  3. (zootomy) A sucker of the sepia or cuttlefish and related animals.
  4. (zootomy) The large posterior sucker of the leeches.
  5. (zootomy) One of the lobes of the placenta in ruminating animals.
  6. A vinegar saucer, especially (historical) in ancient Roman contexts.
  7. (historical) A Roman unit of liquid measure reckoned as the volume of 2½ Roman ounces of wine and equivalent to about 66 mL although differing slightly over time.

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Latin[edit]

This entry needs quotations to illustrate usage. If you come across any interesting, durably archived quotes then please add them!

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From acētum (vinegar) +‎ -bulum (a vessel for).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

acētābulum n (genitive acētābulī); second declension

  1. acetabulum, a saucer for vinegar
  2. saucer, any similarly sized and shaped dish
  3. (historical) acetabulum, a Roman unit of liquid measure equivalent to about 66 mL
  4. (anatomy) acetabulum, the hipbone socket
  5. (zootomy) acetabulum, the suckers or cavities in the arms of polypi
  6. (botany) acetabulum, the cup of a flower

Inflection[edit]

Second-declension noun (neuter).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative acētābulum acētābula
Genitive acētābulī acētābulōrum
Dative acētābulō acētābulīs
Accusative acētābulum acētābula
Ablative acētābulō acētābulīs
Vocative acētābulum acētābula

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References[edit]

  • acetabulum”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • acetabulum in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • acetabulum in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette
  • acetabulum”, in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • acetabulum”, in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin