betake

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English betaken, bitaken, in form equivalent to be- +‎ take, however, in sense from betæcen, betechen (to beteach). More at beteach.

Verb[edit]

betake (third-person singular simple present betakes, present participle betaking, simple past betook, past participle betaken)

  1. (transitive) To beteach.

Etymology 2[edit]

From be- +‎ take. Cognate with Danish betage (to take, deprive, cut off), Swedish betaka (to take, deprive, cut off).

Verb[edit]

betake (third-person singular simple present betakes, present participle betaking, simple past betook, past participle betaken)

  1. (transitive, obsolete) To take over to; take across (to); deliver.
  2. (transitive, obsolete) To seize; lay hold of; take. [from 15th c.]
    • 1891, Mary Noailles Murfree, In the "Stranger People's" Country, Nebraska 2005, p. 194:
      a rain-cloud [...] had betaken a dusky brown color, and about its lower verge a fringe of fine straight lines of rain was suggested [...].
  3. (reflexive, archaic) To take one's self to; go or move; repair; resort; have recourse. [from 17th c.]
    • 1885, Sir Richard Burton, The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Night 12:
      I was glad of my arrival for I was wearied with the way, and yellow of face for weakness and want; but my plight was pitiable and I knew not whither to betake me.
    They betook themselves to treaty and submission. — Burke.
    The rest, in imitation, to like arms / Betook them. — Milton.
  4. (reflexive, archaic) To commit to a specified action. [from 16th c.]
  5. (transitive, archaic) To commend or entrust to; to commit to.
  6. (intransitive, archaic) To take oneself.
Synonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]