binocular

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French binoculaire.

Adjective[edit]

binocular (not comparable)

  1. Using two eyes or viewpoints; especially, using two eyes or viewpoints to ascertain distance.
    a binocular microscope or telescope
    • (Can we date this quote by Derham and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      Most animals are binocular.
    • 2013 July 9, Joselle DiNunzio Kehoe, “Cognition, brains and Riemann”, in plus.maths.org[1], retrieved 2013-09-08:
      our perception of distance arises from the geometry of binocular vision and our early learning seems based on calculating probabilities.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

binocular (plural binoculars)

  1. attributive form of binoculars
  2. A pair of binoculars.
    • 1956, Delano Ames, chapter 14, in Crime out of Mind[2]:
      He gazed around until on the lid of a spinet he spotted a promising collection of bottles, gin, whiskey, vermouth and sherry, mixed with violin bows, a flute, a toppling pile of books, six volumes of Grove's Dictionary mingled with paperback thrillers, a guitar without any strings, a pair of binoculars, a meerschaum pipe and a jar half-full of wasps and apricot jam.
  3. (dated) Any binocular glass, such as an opera glass, telescope, or microscope.

See also[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From bi- +‎ -n- +‎ ocular.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

binocular m or f (plural binoculares, comparable)

  1. binocular (using two eyes or viewpoints)

Etymology 2[edit]

From binóculos +‎ -ar.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

binocular (first-person singular present indicative binoculo, past participle binoculado)

  1. to observe using binoculars
Conjugation[edit]

Spanish[edit]

Adjective[edit]

binocular (plural binoculares)

  1. binocular