calyx

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English[edit]

The calyx of a flower is usually green. Its parts are called sepals.
The parts numbered 8., 14., and 15. are called calyx.

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin calyx, from Ancient Greek κάλυξ (kálux, case of a bud, husk). Doublet of chalice.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈkæ.lɪks/, /ˈkeɪ.lɪks/

Noun[edit]

calyx (plural calyces or calyxes)

  1. (botany) The outermost whorl of flower parts, comprising the sepals, which covers and protects the petals as they develop.
    Meronym: sepal
  2. (zoology, anatomy) Any of various cup-like structures.
    1. A chamber in the mammalian kidney through which urine passes.
    2. The crown containing the viscera of crinoids and similar echinoderms, entoprocts, and the polyps of some cnidarians.
    3. A funnel-shaped expansion of the vas deferens or oviduct of insects.
    4. A flattened cap of neuropil in the brain of insects.

Translations[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek κάλυξ (kálux, case of a bud, husk).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

calyx m (genitive calycis); third declension

  1. The bud, cup, or calyx of a flower or nut.
  2. A plant of two kinds, resembling the arum, perhaps the monk's hood.
  3. (by extension) The shell of fruits, pericarp.
  4. (by extension) An eggshell.
  5. A fitting on a Roman pipe

Declension[edit]

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative calyx calycēs
Genitive calycis calycum
Dative calycī calycibus
Accusative calycem calycēs
Ablative calyce calycibus
Vocative calyx calycēs

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • English: calyx
  • French: calice

See also[edit]

References[edit]