caricature

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See also: caricaturé

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
A caricature of Abraham Lincoln.

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French caricature, from Italian caricatura.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈkɛɹɪkət͡ʃʊɚ/, /ˈkɛɹɪkət͡ʃɚ/, (rare) /kəˈɹɪkət͡ʃʊɚ/, (also rare) /kəˈɹɪkət͡ʃɚ/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈkæɹɪkətʃʊə/, /ˈkæɹɪkətʃə/
    • (file)

Noun[edit]

caricature (plural caricatures)

  1. A pictorial representation of someone in which distinguishing features are exaggerated for comic effect.
    • 2012 May 24, Nathan Rabin, “Film: Reviews: Men In Black 3”, in The Onion AV Club[1]:
      Men In Black 3 lacks the novelty of the first film, and its take on the late ’60s feels an awful lot like a psychedelic dress-up party, all broad caricatures and groovy vibes.
  2. A grotesque misrepresentation.
  3. (computing) In facial recognition systems, a face that has been modified to look less like the average face, and thus more distinctive.

Derived terms[edit]

Adjective[edit]

caricature (not comparable)

  1. Having the characteristics of a caricature, grotesque.
    • 1837, L[etitia] E[lizabeth] L[andon], Ethel Churchill: Or, The Two Brides. [], volume II, London: Henry Colburn, [], OCLC 21345056, pages 274–275:
      That singularly foolish old lady, her grandmother, got up a sort of caricature conspiracy, and Miss Churchill was to have been married to a coxcombical Jacobite, of the name of Trevanion; but he was arrested in the church, though he has since escaped by means of the jailor's daughter.

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Verb[edit]

caricature (third-person singular simple present caricatures, present participle caricaturing, simple past and past participle caricatured)

  1. To represent someone in an exaggerated or distorted manner.
    • 1834, L[etitia] E[lizabeth] L[andon], Francesca Carrara. [], volume I, London: Richard Bentley, [], (successor to Henry Colburn), OCLC 630079698, page 180:
      Their faults grew suddenly perceptible, and their absurdities an unfailing subject of mimicry. All these, in his hands, became singularly amusing. Francesca, who had little knowledge, and no envy, of the individuals so relentlessly caricatured, could not help being entertained.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Italian caricatura, from the verb caricare (to load; to exaggerate), cognate with French charger.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

caricature f (plural caricatures)

  1. caricature

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Italian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ka.ri.kaˈtu.re/
  • Rhymes: -ure
  • Hyphenation: ca‧ri‧ca‧tù‧re

Noun[edit]

caricature f

  1. plural of caricatura

Spanish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /kaɾikaˈtuɾe/ [ka.ɾi.kaˈt̪u.ɾe]
  • Rhymes: -uɾe
  • Syllabification: ca‧ri‧ca‧tu‧re

Verb[edit]

caricature

  1. inflection of caricaturar:
    1. first/third-person singular present subjunctive
    2. third-person singular imperative